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View Full Version : Is The Ongoing Calcium Controversy Overlooking The Basics?



Aaltrude
05-31-12, 04:04 PM
May 27th 2012 by Dr. Rivkah Roth

Research does not distinguish between calcium leached from bones and teeth in response to inflammation and any calcium intake from supplements.

Initially published in shortened form (April 28, 2011)

Several recent studies claim that calcium supplements increase heart disease and stroke risk.[1] Should you stop taking calcium supplements? Unfortunately, we tend to think of research trials and their results as gospel. Some research results may be confusing or, worse, represent a partial truth as the gospel by drawing conclusions based on simplified premises. Many research projects tend to overlook important prerequisites. For instance, a recent calcium research project fails to report on several highly important factors such as:

1) What forms of calcium supplements were taken and in what amounts?

Read more: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/ongoing-calcium-controversy-overlooking-basics

Mr. Wizard
05-31-12, 09:40 PM
Very informative article. It points out, for example, that magnesium, vitamins D3 and K are all very important co-factors in the body's ability to properly use calcium.

Reesacat
05-31-12, 09:47 PM
I have a great deal of respect for Dr. Roth and enjoy her articles. She made several excellent points but.....

Here is the study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22626900
This study was comprised of almost 24,000 people over 11 years.....I do think that large a group would level out some of the variables she talks about. It seemed the only difference noted with increased risk of a heart attack was taking a calcium supplement and it was 86%.....

That would be enough information to make me stop taking a calcium supplement!

Islander
06-01-12, 08:32 AM
People who eat a varied, healthful diet should get enough calcium from dark green leafy vegetables and possibly dairy as well. The problem: in the U.S. (and increasingly, in the rest of the developed world) leafy green vegetables do not form a significant part of the diet. Not much calcium in a burger and fries....

Aaltrude
06-01-12, 04:01 PM
People who eat a varied, healthful diet should get enough calcium from dark green leafy vegetables and possibly dairy as well.
I agree with one proviso ........ as long as they have a healthy digestive system. Digestive issues can arise from a variety of causes, for instance Coeliac disease/gluten intolerance, other food intolerances, exposure to environmental toxins.
I eat a healthy diet with plenty of greens yet due to past exposure to toxins, my digestion is not optimal. The fact that the cramps do need a small amount of supplemental calcium to be resolved suggests that in spite of the greens in my diet, I am not absorbing it effectively.