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View Full Version : Thin Is In, But Fat Might Be Better



Julieanne
01-19-13, 05:48 AM
Lisa O'Neill Hill
January 16, 2013

CNN -- When Janet Servoss shops for clothes in Orange County, California, she sees plenty of selection in sizes 0, 2 and 4, but fewer in sizes 12 and 14.

"You're bombarded by it daily," she said of the message that thin is better. "It's everywhere."
But according to a report (http://www.cnn.com/2013/01/02/health/overweight-mortality/index.html) published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, being thin might not be in your best interest in the long run. The report is drawing strong reaction in the medical community, among proponents who hail its findings and among critics, one of whom dismisses it as "rubbish."

The comprehensive study confirmed that obese people tend to die earlier than people of normal weight. But it also found that overweight people -- those with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 to 30 -- had a lower risk of dying than people of normal weight.

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/01/16/health/weight-study/index.html?hpt=hp_bn12

Islander
01-19-13, 11:25 AM
I agree with the Harvard Medical School guy: "It causes a lot of confusion that's completely unnecessary...a pile of rubbish." There are so many confounding factors in meta studies like these that trying to sort them all would be a real hairball. The only situation I can think of where carrying excess weight might be beneficial might be just prior to pregnancy, which puts heavy demands on a woman's body. To draw a parallel: in sheep management, ewes are fed on a rising plane of nutrition for two weeks prior to introducing the ram to the flock. Being well-nourished increases the likelihood of twins, which is the objective in sheep breeding. The high nutrition level is maintained throughout pregnancy and lactation.

Reesacat
01-19-13, 11:37 AM
Part of the problem is the media I think. If you look at the women who were considered beautiful back in the 1940's and 50's such as Marilyn Monroe they were not the skinny anorexic Kate Moss types. They had curves and were probably at least 15 pounds over what is considered the upper limit of 'normal' weight today.
I think those body types are much more realistic than what is being promoted today. A bit of good muscle and plumpness I think is healthy.

Islander
01-19-13, 11:44 AM
Good point, Reesacat. The emphasis on high-visibility fashion models who are practically anorexic has distorted our perception of "normal" size and shape.

Julieanne
01-20-13, 07:20 AM
Part of the problem is the media I think. If you look at the women who were considered beautiful back in the 1940's and 50's such as Marilyn Monroe they were not the skinny anorexic Kate Moss types. They had curves and were probably at least 15 pounds over what is considered the upper limit of 'normal' weight today.
I think those body types are much more realistic than what is being promoted today. A bit of good muscle and plumpness I think is healthy.


I would love some of those curves!