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DizzyIzzy
12-08-08, 02:21 PM
I bought one of these a few weeks ago, out of curiosity and guilt at never flossing (HATE HATE HATE it!) or using mouthwash (give me a non-toxic one and perhaps I'll consider it...).

I wasn't sure at first how good it would be. It arrived and there is definitely a battery in there, as there's a test button, but it doesn't buzz like a normal electric toothbrush. There's a metal strip around the middle of it, and you're meant to just wet your finger or palm and touch the strip while you brush your teeth as you would with a normal toothbrush, just keeping the 'wet' contact with the metal strip.

So I tried it, and although my teeth were clean, I didn't really think they felt much different than with a normal one. The bristles were also really hard, and the head really small, which took some getting used to. So I was a bit sceptical of it.

BUT... there's always a but...

Having used it for a week or so, my teeth started to feel really really clean. They felt smoother and better defined, and sharper too. Also, it seemed to amplify the taste of my natural toothpaste, which is minty but the mint never lasts like it does with colgate or something. My breathe seems much fresher as well, and feels cleaner.

So I've used it a few weeks, and you know what? I actually think it works! Really well.

So.... if you're after something that'll get your teeth cleaner, and is cheap [mine was 8, got it in the UK, not sure on prices elsewhere], and easy to use and non-toxic, or you're like me and hate flossing... then give it a go and see what you think!

This is the one I've got, but I'm sure there are other models around and companies etc.

http://www.ionicbrush.com/

Samurai
12-08-08, 07:21 PM
I have a holistic dentist and he sells these suckers for $110.00! So you liked yours, huh? Do you think it is stripping the enamel though? I like to get my teeth professsionally bleached every 3 years or so, but I am unsure about that light/gel stuff, so that is why I only do it only 3 years or so.

DizzyIzzy
12-08-08, 07:48 PM
I'm not sure! I don't think so, it feels just like using a normal toothbrush but my teeth feel super clean now. The only problem I have with it is how hard the bristles are - if you could get medium ones that'd be better (though I haven't actually looked into that yet, so you could well do for all I know). In the meantime I just brush gently.

I just hate dentists in general, I have major issues with going to them. In fact, I think I'm overdue a visit by about a year [and know I have a couple of tiny holes that don't bother me but they'll want to scrape and drill and fill with who knows what... yick]. I would get them bleached but I worry about it damaging them - we don't seem to have this fascination with white teeth you yanks do so I'm safe for now, till it catches on over here. ;) ( <3 ).

$110 is steep though - here's a few links for you. ;)

http://www.natural-alternative-products.co.uk/hyg-ionic-toothbrush-p-946.html

http://www.nigelsecostore.com/acatalog/soladey-ionic-toothbrush.html

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=hyg+ionic+toothbrush (US site - $25. Lol @ 'new and used')

http://www.pitrok.co.uk/cat--Oral-hygiene-The-Tongue-Cleaner-and-ionic-toothbrushes--Oralhygiene.html

Reesacat
12-08-08, 09:49 PM
Dizzy, many people do EFT before going to the dentist to help them neutralize the 'energy glitch' you get from the dentists. Many tap on the thoughts of the dreaded drill (vibration, noise, feel, etc.).
Don't know if that would help you.
I think any normal sane person doesn't like the dentist.

Islander
12-08-08, 09:55 PM
I dreaded the dentist. Having no money in grad school was my excuse not to go. Marriage and a family were more good excuses. So good that by the time I was 40, it would have cost more to arrest the loss of my once perfect teeth than to get dentures. Best decision I ever made! No mercury worries for me!

Samurai
12-09-08, 01:30 PM
.

I would get them bleached but I worry about it damaging them - we don't seem to have this fascination with white teeth you yanks do so I'm safe for now, till it catches on over here. ;) ( <3 ).

$110 is steep though - here's a few links for you. ;)


Oralhygiene.html (http://www.pitrok.co.uk/cat--Oral-hygiene-The-Tongue-Cleaner-and-ionic-toothbrushes--Oralhygiene.html)

Girl, I dun told 'ya before. People in the NE part of the US are Yankees.

Hey, is <3) boobs and a belly? If so, that is me, for sure.

Sometimes I get so carried away with the teeth bleaching thing, that it looks almost characture. In the summer when I am suntanned, I look like I can glow in the dark.

Islander
12-09-08, 02:50 PM
Samurai, why would you bleach your teeth? That is so unnatural.

Clarification: to people in the U.S., New Englanders, or folks above he Mason-Dixon Line, are "Yankees."

To all others, "Yankees" refers to Americans in the aggregate.

Aaltrude
12-09-08, 03:06 PM
In NZ, if we want to use this term we usually shorten to "Yanks" and yes Islander, we use it to refer to all Americans.

DizzyIzzy
12-09-08, 05:28 PM
I'm afraid to say I had to look at the map to see where those states were... :P

You're all yanks to me! That's not an insult by the way. Love yas really. As long as you aren't part of The Administration. <3

<3 = big love to all you fellow landlubbers of the land of the big mac happy meal combo on the other side of the great ocean etc etc.

Or just boobs and a belly. ;)


PS Where does the term 'yank/yankee' come from? And likewise, 'pom' for the British? Anyone know?





.........and back to the teeth. Have decided they need these toothbrushes in a variety of pretty colours, and with different bristle strengths.

Islander
12-09-08, 05:47 PM
Origin:
1750–60, Americanism; perh. back formation from D Jan Kees John Cheese, nickname (mistaken for plural) applied by the Dutch of colonial New York to English settlers in Connecticuthttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/luna/thinsp.png

Pom is short for pommie:
Pommy

(also Pommie)
• noun (pl. Pommies) Austral./NZ informal, derogatory a British person.
— ORIGIN said by some to be short for pomegranate, as a near rhyme to immigrant.

Aaltrude
12-09-08, 05:56 PM
Origin:
175060, Americanism; perh. back formation from D Jan Kees John Cheese, nickname (mistaken for plural) applied by the Dutch of colonial New York to English settlers in Connecticuthttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/luna/thinsp.png



Jan -my dutch husband's middle name, pronounced 'Yan'.
Kees - the nick name for someone called Cornelius. It is pronounced 'case' as in suitcase.

Samurai
12-10-08, 10:24 AM
[quote=Islander]Samurai, why would you bleach your teeth? That is so unnatural.

quote]
Well.... I do admit that I still have some "habits". I still get hi-lites done on my hair, and I also still get the acrylics done. (but they are in good taste; short, and french style).
I am an 85%-er "do good to my body." That is kinda the GPA I had in school as well. I still leave room to be a bit naughty. :)