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View Full Version : TV ads try to sweeten public opinion on high fructose corn syrup



Islander
12-10-08, 11:07 AM
You've got to love American advertising: it's utterly shameless. We're so used to having a constant Niagra Falls of sales messages flowing over us that we're no longer shocked at what's being hawked. Now a big industry that's as insidious as Big Pharma and Big Tobacco is pinning its hopes on a TV advertising campaign to put a friendly face on their horrible product. This time, it's Big Corn: the makers of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).
HFCS is the nearly inescapable junk food that's a major ingredient in a dizzying array of America's foods. There's loads of HFCS in nearly everything kids (and many adults) eat and drink - soda, "fruit" drinks, cookies, gum, jelly, and baked goods. And that's only a partial list. In fact, the national consumption of this hidden junk food grew from zero in 1966 to 62.6 pounds per person by 2001. Imagine what it is today!
The new TV commercials are "designed to correct the record" said Audrae Erickson, president of the Corn Refiners Association (CRA), and are "not a campaign to drive consumption."
The "record" that I suppose the CRA is looking to correct are the multiple scientific studies that have linked America's obesity epidemic in adults and children with the increased consumption of HFCS. I guess the CRA doesn't want the facts to get in the way of their sweet story.
According to an Emory University study published earlier this year, upwards of 10 percent of Americans' daily caloric intake comes from fructose - including HFCS. And I'm willing to bet that a decent chunk of that 10 percent is HFCS.
The problem with HFCS is that it's SO common that it shows up not only in products that many people already assume to have a high sugar content, but in a wide range of products that you wouldn't think would have any sweeteners in them - like Stouffer's Stove Top Stuffings, Sara Lee Heart Healthy Whole Grain Bread, Thomas's English Muffins, Kellogg's Special K cereal, Campbell's Vegetable Soup, and more. And many of those products claim to have some health benefit!
So don't tell me that the CRA is being "fair" or "interesting" when they're trying to say that HFCS is "just like sugar" and "fine in moderation." Even when you're doing your level best to eat right, it's disturbing to know that you're still getting a fair amount of HFCS when you're having your sandwich on Sara Lee Hearth Healthy Whole Grain Bread!
If you'll recall, earlier this year the Corn Refiner's Association tried to get products with HFCS labeled as "natural," and they were smacked down by the FDA. And it takes a lot to wake the FDA from its perpetual stupor.
Oh, believe me: products containing HFSC should be labeled, all right. There should be a big, easy-to-read stamp on them that says "CONTAINS HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP."
I'm telling you now - if they did that, there wouldn't be enough TV commercials on the planet that would fix their plummeting sales. That would be a not-so-sweet surprise for these guys.


Source: http://www.douglassreport.com/dailydose/dd200810/dd20081010a.html

DizzyIzzy
12-10-08, 02:19 PM
Lol, it's not just in the US it's bad - how about this one from the margarine people in the UK??

http://www.satfatnav.com/

Sooooooooooooo much misinformation it'd be laughable if people didn't believe it.

PPARGammaGirl
12-10-08, 04:04 PM
Satfatland??? Win a fridge makeover??? Haha - send a nutteritionist round to poke around in my fridge and he/she'd have a heart attack. Cream, full-fat milk, butter, beef dripping, bacon dripping, 10+ different cheeses, streaky bacon, eggs, cream cheese, sour cream, mmmm, satfat... nom, nom, nom!
Margarine.... vomit!

Samurai
12-10-08, 04:10 PM
Satfatland??? Win a fridge makeover??? Haha - send a nutteritionist round to poke around in my fridge and he/she'd have a heart attack. Cream, full-fat milk, butter, beef dripping, bacon dripping, 10+ different cheeses, streaky bacon, eggs, cream cheese, sour cream, mmmm, satfat... nom, nom, nom!
Margarine.... vomit!
I agree!!! I mix anything and everything with Crème fraîche; garlic, fruits, cinnamon, nuts....

PPARGammaGirl
12-10-08, 05:16 PM
Creme fraiche is ludicrously expensive here but as buttermilk has recently become available and so many dairy products now contain carrageenan I'm going to start making my own creme fraiche and cream cheese.

DizzyIzzy
12-10-08, 05:49 PM
Mmmmmm sounds like my fridge, minus the bacon stuff. Blech, pig meat makes me sick. :P

I'm not a fan of creme fraiche, but I looooove probiotic greek yoghurt. I eat a big jar of it every day and mix it with everything. So creamy and rich and cool and good.

My workmates would always try and tell me that I was going to give myself a heart attack because I'd sit and eat cheese, fruit, yoghurt, full-fat milk with my non-decaff tea, cream, butter, lots of nuts, etc etc and tell me how unhealthy and foolish I was for eating so much 'fatty' food while they swigged their can of diet coke and munched low-calorie glucose-syruppy 'muesli bars'... I only had to point out how many sick days I'd taken that year (none) and my good figure (size 8 compare their size 18) and it shut them up pretty quick. ;)

Now show me the mega-saturated-fat laden cream, baby!! None of this semi-fat half-skimmed super-heated half-arse job everyone loves so much.

Samurai
12-10-08, 11:27 PM
Mascarpone cheese is wonderful with berries by the way.

PPARGammaGirl
12-13-08, 11:12 PM
My colleagues used to actively gag when they saw me drinking my cream at morning tea.

DizzyIzzy
12-14-08, 07:33 AM
Hahaha.

Right now, probiotic natural greek yoghurt with frozen berries (ones you've picked yourself and frozen, not bought) are the way forward. The crunchy icy texture is really good at first with the creamy yoghurt, and then as they melt the flavour gets stronger and they get a bit softer and it's even better. Sort of like ice-cream but not.

Islander
12-14-08, 11:41 AM
Izzy, how is natural greek yoghurt different from the store brand I buy? It contains cultured pasteurized nonfat milk and active yogurt cultures.

PPARGammaGirl
12-15-08, 12:17 AM
You can make your own Greek yoghurt easily. I use full fat pasteurised milk (still can't get raw), make yoghurt as you would normally, then once it's set pour it into a tea towel, tie into a ball with string, and suspend hanging from the shelf in the fridge overnight with a bowl to catch the drips. It's better than the stuff you buy but without the yucky skimmed milk products.

DizzyIzzy
12-15-08, 07:15 AM
I just buy it Islander - by 'natural' I mean that it's just organic yoghurt with the probiotic culture, and greek-style (i.e. creamy and rich and thick and full of flavour, instead of sloppy and watery like normal yoghurt). I broke my yoghurt maker but you can make it in those easily enough too if you have one. Must replace that one day.

mellowsong
12-16-08, 12:55 AM
You can make your own Greek yoghurt easily. I use full fat pasteurised milk (still can't get raw),

Thanks to my yahoo kefir group I know that raw milk in Australia is called "bath milk" because raw milk is illegal, but lots of folks in the group buy it as it is fresh, from pasteured cows and raw. I don't know if that would hold true in NZ though.

Islander
12-16-08, 12:40 PM
"it is fresh, from pasteured cows and raw."

Uh, don't mean to pick nits, but I bet those cows have been eating grass. I doubt they've been through a heat process.... ;-)

mellowsong
12-16-08, 01:27 PM
"it is fresh, from pasteured cows and raw."

Uh, don't mean to pick nits, but I bet those cows have been eating grass. I doubt they've been through a heat process.... ;-)

ROFL...forgive me, I'm in adrenal brain fog. Do you know how many times I had to look at that before I realized what I did? :)