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ozy ness
01-14-09, 09:33 AM
New studies are linking toxic mouthwash to oral cancers......

Experts divided over mouthwash claims

January 11, 2009
Claims of a link between antiseptic mouthwash and oral cancer have divided leading dental experts.
A review article published in the current issue of the Dental Journal of Australia concludes there is now "sufficient evidence" that "alcohol-containing mouthwashes contribute to the increased risk of development of oral cancer".
However, Professor Laurence Walsh, head of the School of Dentistry at the University of Queensland on Sunday rejected the claim and said their was no established link between mouthwash and oral cancer.
In a letter to the editors of the journal, Professor Walsh criticised the authors of the paper for drawing on a "small and selective group of studies".
"A wide range of critical and systematic reviews over many years have failed to show any statistically significant association between mouthwash use and oral cancer," he said.
"There is certainly nothing in the current paper to change our thinking in that regard."
According to the article, which is authored by several independent experts, ethanol in mouthwash is thought to allow cancer-causing substances to permeate the lining of the mouth more easily and cause harm.
Acetaldehyde, a toxic by-product of alcohol that may accumulate in the oral cavity when swished around the mouth, is also believed to be carcinogenic.
Mouthwash is one of the fastest-growing grocery products in Australia, with the category now worth more than $75 million, according to the latest Nielsen market research.
Lead review author Professor Michael McCullough, associate professor of oral medicine at the University of Melbourne, told News Ltd that alcohol-containing mouthwash should be reclassified as prescription-only and carry written health warnings.
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Samurai
01-14-09, 10:06 AM
Hi, Ozzy.
I saw this article on VV yesterday. Long before I started studying health, I suspected mouthwash was evil. When I was a kid, I used to play a game with myself whereby I would see how long it took my eyes to tear up while holding a mouthful of Listerine. It gave me a "rush".

Those Listerine strips are just plain gross. I cannot imagine swallowing that crap.

Islander
01-14-09, 10:12 AM
Another example of "better living through chemistry."

ozy ness
01-14-09, 10:12 AM
Yeah I have never used the toxic stuff - just the smell put me off...

I haven't been to VV for a long time now so perhaps I should go and stir up the mods with a post ;):D

DizzyIzzy
01-14-09, 08:25 PM
Horrible stuff.

I just use warm water with sea salt... works fine. I was told to use that when I had my wisdom teeth out, so I figure if it's ok for then it's ok for now.

Reesacat
01-14-09, 10:45 PM
Hydrogen peroxide and baking soda make a great toothpaste/tea stain remover:)

Aaltrude
01-15-09, 12:49 AM
You do have to be careful with baking soda if using it as a toothpaste though as its abrasive action can damage tooth enamel.

ozy ness
02-03-09, 11:10 AM
You do have to be careful with baking soda if using it as a toothpaste though as its abrasive action can damage tooth enamel.
Taken from the FAQ on my website - www.vjcorganics.com (http://www.vjcorganics.com)

Bicarb soda is an extremely low abrasive, contrary to popular myth; it will NOT abrade tooth enamel. The following information has been extracted from the Arm &Hammer website about the use of bicarb soda in toothpastes:
www.myoralcare.com/ArmAndHammerUniversity/ (http://www.myoralcare.com/ArmAndHammerUniversity/)
New research proves bicarb soda a more effective whitener.
Data from six clinical and laboratory studies presented at a recent peer-reviewed symposium shows that a toothpaste with a high concentration of bicarb soda cleaned away plaque and reduced deep tooth stain better than leading regular toothpastes. Other reported pluses for a high-content bicarb soda toothpaste: it deodorizes and freshens bad breath and is minimally abrasive.
But the research shows that it takes a high concentration of bicarb soda to get the full benefits. Bicarb soda removes plaque with low abrasion.
Studies show that when there are high concentrations of bicarb soda in a toothpaste, it will exist in two forms in the mouth: dissolved in liquid and as solid particles to provide two mechanisms for cleaning both tooth surfaces and deep stain. When research compared three different toothpastes, it was concluded that a high-content bicarb soda toothpaste was superior at daily plaque removal to the two leading regular toothpastes tested that contain hydrated silica and dicalcium phosphate: ingredients more abrasive than bicarb soda.
Whitens with Deep Cleaning
Research showed that use of the high-content bicarb soda toothpaste caused the stained plaque to appear to flake off the tooth like peeling paint. High-content bicarb soda toothpastes were also reported to be better at reducing deep stain and increasing tooth whiteness. A study compared how well toothpastes removed deep stain in 115 people who brushed twice daily for three months. The high-content bicarb soda toothpaste tested significantly increased tooth whiteness, while the leading regular toothpaste did not show any significant changes. It is postulated that bicarb soda's ability to remove deep stain from the crevices in enamel is a factor of concentration and particle size. There has to be enough bicarb soda in the toothpaste to ensure you're brushing with solid particles. Abrasives like hydrated silica and dicalcium phosphate do not break up as readily during brushing; thus, many of those particles can be too large to fit into stained enamel crevices.
References:
J Clin Dent 9:7275, 1998
J Clin Dent 9:5760, 1998

Aaltrude
02-03-09, 02:43 PM
Thank you ozy ness. The place I got my information from did appear to be a very reliable one and from someone who goes the extra mile when researching. There is one one query I have about the source of this information - is it possible to ascertain that the studies were completely independent and not funded, even in part, by a manufacturer of a toothpaste containing baking soda? I'm not trying to get at you with this question, just trying to get all the facts.

DizzyIzzy
02-03-09, 06:19 PM
I brush with baking soda and water every so often, but I find it makes my teeth feel a bit sensitive on the edges (like... the 'bitey' bit, not the sides or top or backs) so won't use it too often. Is anyone aware of there being different sized particles you can get in baking soda, or is it all the same?

Do I sound a bit dumb asking that? Hope not, lol. ;)

Aaltrude
02-03-09, 09:02 PM
I think it is all the same Izzy. Baking soda dissolves in water so I'm sure the particles become smaller as you brush you brush your teeth and they slowly dissolve.

Reesacat
02-03-09, 10:19 PM
I brush with baking soda and water every so often, but I find it makes my teeth feel a bit sensitive on the edges (like... the 'bitey' bit, not the sides or top or backs) so won't use it too often. Is anyone aware of there being different sized particles you can get in baking soda, or is it all the same?

Do I sound a bit dumb asking that? Hope not, lol. ;)

Not at all, Dizzy-that was a good question!
As far as I know it is just one particle size we get in the stores here in the US.