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mellowsong
01-28-10, 03:41 PM
Poster for fragrance-free hospital care
Posted on Jan 26, 2010 by Susie Collins in Blog, Disability Rights, MCS, Susie Collins
This poster was designed as a public service project for patients requiring in-hospital care at hospitals that are still lacking a proper fragrance-free policy for the staff.
The poster comes in two versions: one for Multiple Chemical Sensitivity and one for Severe Allergic Asthma. Click here to download either one in print resolution.
I think the posters are FAB, but I knock off a couple points for using the word “allergen” in the MCS poster. As we all know, MCS is not an allergy, it does not have any of the physiological markers of an allergy. But that criticism aside, this poster rocks. I especially love the part where it says, “Patient is not a Fragrance Crash Test Dummy. Don’t just ‘come & see if it affects the patient.’”

I can't get the poster itself to copy but here is the URL. I sure could have used this last year with multiple hospitalizations for pneumonia. Of course, the VA does not recognize MCS as real!

http://www.thecanaryreport.org/2010/01/26/poster-for-fragrance-free-hospital-care/

Aaltrude
01-28-10, 05:06 PM
I can't get the poster itself to copy but here is the URL. I sure could have used this last year with multiple hospitalizations for pneumonia. Of course, the VA does not recognize MCS as real!


I managed to copy the poster by right clicking on the poster and selecting, save as, and the file I wanted to save it in.

mellowsong
01-28-10, 05:53 PM
I managed to copy the poster by right clicking on the poster and selecting, save as, and the file I wanted to save it in.

I meant I couldn't copy it to this site. I may just not know what I'm doing, lol. If you can that would be great! I did that, but it still didn't come through here.

Samurai
01-28-10, 08:23 PM
OK now I know you are going to think I am whackadoodle for this one, but hear me out.

As someone that absolutely flips out with diesel exhaust, I absolutely understand what you are saying. But as you mentioned above, not everyone takes this seriously. After all, they don't suffer from smells, why do you?
That being mentioned, it seems that many would take this as a joke, and the FONT and the manner that the poster is written makes it look like the designer is making a parody of the multiple chemical issue. I understand the content is not poking fun, but my artistic side says that they need to make it look less cutsy with funzie fonts and make it look more serious, because it is! It's like writing an obit with bright pink script and using bubbly Hello-Kitty style along with some smileys...... it doesn't work!

Islander
01-28-10, 08:46 PM
I agree with Samurai. It's a great idea, but the comic font and overall tone convey the impression that


:) LET'S ALL HAVE SOME FUN WITH THE MCS PATIENT!!! :)



Let's hope the next generation of posters is a bit more thoughtful.

mellowsong
01-29-10, 03:37 PM
You know, now that you've got me thinking about it I agree. I was so excited to see something like that, lol. I think the idea of all that was to make sure it drew attention. Hospital rooms are often full of bland notices like which arm to take blood pressure in, NPO etc etc, that staff in a hurry don't even see them anymore.

Aaltrude
01-29-10, 03:43 PM
You know, now that you've got me thinking about it I agree. I was so excited to see something like that, lol. I think the idea of all that was to make sure it drew attention. Hospital rooms are often full of bland notices like which arm to take blood pressure in, NPO etc etc, that staff in a hurry don't even see them anymore.

At least this poster gives some good ideas for making up one of your own should you ever need it. Perhaps a colouful, attention grabbing heading with the information subdued would work.

EmmaPeel
01-29-10, 05:26 PM
Took a look at the poster, and although it means well, it is VERY playful with even a spelling error. Must have been created as a school project, I figure.
(That is often the case. Nursing students and the likes, put up contests in their Community school placements for 'poster' requests).

I totally agree with Samarai. The issue of too many posters and signs is definitely and issue in hospitals/clinics/bus shelters/train stations/restaurants...etc...

You can have a poster in bold font, on the door of a public place and many people have visual overload causing them to subconsciously blank out what is written.

I find that the little amount written the better. A strong, bold and firm warning in multiple places will catch the eye, also asking them to speak to the receptionist or nurse before entering. Oddly, the public washroom seems to be the place most spend more time in.

People freak when they think they may expose themselves to something nasty, so they will tend to ask what the ALERT sign is all about.

...personally, I tend to spot the obvious coiffed, over sprayed, highly bejeweled, major makeup group and stop them in their tracks. Having said that, there are those who try to cover bad hygiene by being over perfumed.

Bottom Line: Post frequently, but keep your post simple. Make the reader feel that they are at risk of exposure to some kind of 'potential danger', rather than the other way around...;)

Works for me...

EmmaPeel
01-29-10, 05:34 PM
**ALERT**

TO ALL THOSE

ENTERING




IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOU PLEASE SPEAK TO THE

OWNER/CARETAKER/RECEPTIONIST/NURSE

PRIOR TO YOUR ENTRANCE


(...then make sure you have a list of all the things that are prohibited to give them to read over immediately)

mellowsong
01-29-10, 07:58 PM
**ALERT**

TO ALL THOSE ENTERING
IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOU PLEASE SPEAK TO THE
OWNER/CARETAKER/RECEPTIONIST/NURSE
PRIOR TO YOUR ENTRANCE
(...then make sure you have a list of all the things that are prohibited to give them to read over immediately)

After multiple hospitalizations between November and March, I can tell you it does absolutely NO GOOD to speak to them, give them lists etc. For one thing, the VA system doesn't recognize chemical sensitivity as anything but psychological and has electric air fresheners in all bathrooms along with scented cleanser that squirts down the toilet every time it is flushed.

I have complained as high up as the hospital commander and gotten absolutely no response. I see a pulmonologist, he's a pulmonary fellow, doing post residency training, so supposedly very well educated. Any time I bring up my problems with chemicals, I'm told there is no such thing! I'm applying for unemployability due to this. I was told that I cannot mention MCS or chemicals but only the word asthma.

As far as the hospital stays, one nurse threw my list away in front of me, telling me "we don't have to staff to accommodate things like this; asked the doc to put it in my record but he refused. The only way I protected myself at all was forbidding the cleaning person to come in my room, and putting a clip over the thing in the toilet. I had to suffer with the sheets.

Anyway, at least in the VA system, it is a useless battle. I mean, this same system fails to recognize Agent Orange as a problem or Gulf War Syndrome or cancer or or or.

So, next time (God forbid) I will have a poster of some sort I will post all over and ask to put on the top of my chart too.

I do have to say, the one night I spent in a civilian hospital, there didn't seem to be a problem but I wasn't there long enough for it to be an issue, lol.

EmmaPeel
01-29-10, 09:39 PM
...I am so sorry mellow for all you have suffered.

Things are a bit different up here(but only slightly) as I can attest to in my travels. There are NO plug in's, air fresheners, toilet ducks tolerated, and bedding can be washed at home and returned if the stuff is too harsh.

We still do allow plants, which is something I must say I do not agree to since they carry things that cause issues in woundcare and with those who have serious respiratory problems relating to scents, molds, etc. My goal is to have all cleaning supplies go completely GREEN...but that is a work in progress.

No staff, patient, or guest is allowed in if they wear perfume or cologne, deodorants or are heavily scented with bath wash or haircare products.

The push in civilian hospitals has been mainly because staff are becoming chemically sensitive. I see it everyday.

You are right. Hospital situations are too understaffed to put someone on the alert to monitoring consistently what comes in, sadly.

Nonetheless, I am seriously appalled that your chart is not flagged. That should be standard practice and I would encourage you to have it done now rather than wait for a time when you may be too ill to fight back.

Keep up the good fight...

Samurai
01-30-10, 01:06 AM
Or, take a more Machiavellian approach: http://www.websmileys.com/sm/evil/2.gif

WARNING: Before you enter this room, YOUR health may be in danger if you enter the room with perfumes, air fresheners, or cleaning supplies. If you are wearing perfume, PLEASE be warned in advance that I have H4IC9PMO48P. What this means is, if you are wearing or carrying anything that has a perfumed odor, it will mix with my illness, and create carbon monoxide and cyanide that you will inhale. If you inhale this, you will expire. A very advanced and lofty gentleman in a white coat told me so.
You MUST sign the release form stating that you have none of the above. I cannot be responsible for your death.
Thank you in advance,
Mellowsong.

EmmaPeel
01-30-10, 01:16 AM
Or, take a more Machiavellian approach: http://www.websmileys.com/sm/evil/2.gif

WARNING: Before you enter this room, YOUR health may be in danger if you enter the room with perfumes, air fresheners, or cleaning supplies. If you are wearing perfume, PLEASE be warned in advance that I have H4IC9PMO48P. What this means is, if you are wearing or carrying anything that has a perfumed odor, it will mix with my illness, and create carbon monoxide and cyanide that you will inhale. If you inhale this, you will expire. A very advanced and lofty gentleman in a white coat told me so.
You MUST sign the release form stating that you have none of the above. I cannot be responsible for your death.
Thank you in advance,
Mellowsong.


NOW that would work!! Told ya people would be more inclined to pay attention if they thought that the ALERT was something that might harm or kill THEM!!

Good one, Samarai!! lol

mellowsong
01-30-10, 10:31 AM
Or, take a more Machiavellian approach: http://www.websmileys.com/sm/evil/2.gif

WARNING: Before you enter this room, YOUR health may be in danger if you enter the room with perfumes, air fresheners, or cleaning supplies. If you are wearing perfume, PLEASE be warned in advance that I have H4IC9PMO48P. What this means is, if you are wearing or carrying anything that has a perfumed odor, it will mix with my illness, and create carbon monoxide and cyanide that you will inhale. If you inhale this, you will expire. A very advanced and lofty gentleman in a white coat told me so.
You MUST sign the release form stating that you have none of the above. I cannot be responsible for your death.
Thank you in advance,
Mellowsong.

This just might get some attention, lol. I love it :)

Reesacat
01-30-10, 12:00 PM
Or, take a more Machiavellian approach: http://www.websmileys.com/sm/evil/2.gif

WARNING: Before you enter this room, YOUR health may be in danger if you enter the room with perfumes, air fresheners, or cleaning supplies. If you are wearing perfume, PLEASE be warned in advance that I have H4IC9PMO48P. What this means is, if you are wearing or carrying anything that has a perfumed odor, it will mix with my illness, and create carbon monoxide and cyanide that you will inhale. If you inhale this, you will expire. A very advanced and lofty gentleman in a white coat told me so.
You MUST sign the release form stating that you have none of the above. I cannot be responsible for your death.
Thank you in advance,
Mellowsong.

Samurai for Secretary of Health!
Heck,
Samurai for President:)!

Maurya
01-30-10, 05:42 PM
Samurai, you go girl! Wish I had thought of something like that myself!