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View Full Version : If You're Not Eating These 7 Foods . . . You Should Be!



Islander
07-21-10, 08:50 AM
By Catherine Lewis, IH Editor (http://www.insidershealth.com/community/contributor/catherine_lewis/29) -- Published: July 19, 2010

In order to stay healthy – now and well into your future years, it is important that you eat the right foods. The old adage “you are what you eat” is definitely true when it comes to good health. So much so, that science has identified certain foods as “superfoods” – those foods which are packed with powerful nutrients to help you live a longer, healthier life. There are seven superfoods that you should not miss when it comes to good health. How many of these superfoods are you eating on a daily basis?

If you’re not getting enough of these superfoods, you might want to reconfigure your diet:

1. Blueberries - Loaded with Antioxidants

Antioxidants help keep your immune system healthy, and help fight off those nasty free radicals that lead to accelerated aging. Some foods are loaded with more antioxidants and vitamins than others. Blueberries are considered to be not only a superfood, but a “superfruit” as well. Not only are they packed with antioxidants, they are also high in the B vitamins, niacin as well as vitamin C. They are considered to be one of the healthiest foods you can eat and are among the healthiest domestic fruits. Fresh blueberries are your best bet, however. As is the case with most fruits and vegetables, the health content can be slightly compromised if eaten frozen or canned.

2. Broccoli - Loaded with B Vitamins

Broccoli is considered to be one of the healthiest vegetables and is loaded with essential B vitamins. You should try to eat this green veggie a couple of times a week for good overall health. Broccoli is also loaded with antioxidants and, like blueberries, is thought to ward off certain types of cancer.

3. Brazil Nuts - Great for the Heart

Brazil nuts are great for your heart. Like most nuts, they are high in protein and fat (the “good” fat), but are very beneficial for boosting your heart strength. Nuts are an excellent form of protein and studies indicate that Brazil nuts are one of the best varieties to eat for heart health.

4. Apples - Keep the Doctor Away

The old saying “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” is true! Apples are also loaded with vitamins and will not only keep the doctor away, but the dentist, too. Again, it is essential to eat apples fresh in order to receive the true health benefits. So sorry, apple pie doesn’t apply!

5. Salmon - Keep Cholesterol in Check

Fatty fish can help keep cholesterol in check and you can find this in salmon - a food that is high in Omega-3s. In fact, research has shown that fish oils can actually help lower your cholesterol. In addition to being great for the heart, salmon is also an excellent source of protein.

6. Whole Grains - Essential for Good Health

Make sure that you get a daily source of fiber from whole grains, such as oatmeal, brown rice, or pastas, cereals and breads made with whole grains. These foods are often a great source of niacin, the B vitamins and fiber, (necessary for a healthy digestive tract). When your digestive tract is healthy, it seems that your entire body is, too. Eat plenty of whole grains in order to have good digestive – and overall - health.

7. Dark Chocolate – Good for Blood Pressure

And you thought all superfoods were of the traditional “health food” type! More and more research is pointing the fact that dark chocolate is instrumental in regulating blood pressure. This yummy treat is also packed full of antioxidants. The trick is to get the right kind. Bypass milk chocolate (and white chocolate) for the dark variety with 60% or higher cocoa content. In fact, the darker, the better. In addition, the darker it is, the lower the fat and sugar content.

There are numerous other superfoods that you can eat when it comes to following a “balanced” diet. Most of them consist of fruits and vegetables - all essential to good health. These seven are just a few to start with . . . so what are you waiting for?

http://tinyurl.com/2dakfj3

Islander
07-21-10, 08:51 AM
I have reservations on #6, given the number of people who are gluten-intolerant...except that oatmeal and brown rice are not grains.

EmmaPeel
07-21-10, 02:19 PM
I agree. I have now officially been almost, and I say near almost, gluten free and mostly dairy free for about 3 weeks + now, and I can tell the difference. Only gluten free bread, rice, oatmeal, potatoes, rice pasta as my carbs (except for my lapse on Monday morning having two slices of WW bread and two glasses of milk for early breakfast...which I will NEVER do again...! I felt ill the whole day and had diarrhea...sorry :o) I have more energy. I never realized how 'heavy' grains made me feel. Maybe it's just because I have been in 'spa-mode' since the 12th, and the sun is shining gloriously, but I do feel better in my gut. Last night I slept a full straight 5 hours before waking up to pee. Amazing. :D:D

Love blueberries, but never eat enough of them. And dark chocolate. Need to add more.
Eating salmon and pickerel like it's going out of style.
:)
Never been much of a nut person(although Maurya would disagree...;P ) always have trouble digesting nuts, but with the enzymes I will try again...

Reesacat
07-21-10, 03:03 PM
Took a while, but I noticed after being gluten and dairy free for about a year my digestion really improved, didn't need digestive enzymes or probiotics on constant daily basis like before. Entering into 3rd year gluten free I am eating pinto beans no problem:)....

EmmaPeel
07-21-10, 03:20 PM
Reesacat, was it you or was it Aaltrude or was it Mellowsong, that is gallbladder-less?

Just wondering! I am hoping that this will make a permanent difference, although I am pretty sure I will need enzymes for the rest of my life. :rolleyes:

Maurya
07-21-10, 04:07 PM
I am eating pinto beans no problem:)....
As to beans, do you find small beans, such as pinto beans, black beans, adzuki beans, to be more digestible than are kidney beans, lima beans, garbanzo beans, and other large beans? Seems to work that way for me, and I am curious if this means anything for others.

Maurya
07-21-10, 04:10 PM
I have reservations on #6, given the number of people who are gluten-intolerant...except that oatmeal and brown rice are not grains.
Oh, Mama! Oats and rice are not grains? I did not know this. Not gluten-containing grains, certainly, but I had thought that most of the food products that we commonly eat as grains, indeed are grains, with the exception of buckwheat, which is a seed of a grass. Please do clarify the part of this that I do not understand. :)

Aaltrude
07-21-10, 05:16 PM
MMMmmmm as I read point #7, I automatically reached for a piece of dark chocolate lol:D

Aaltrude
07-21-10, 05:17 PM
Reesacat, was it you or was it Aaltrude or was it Mellowsong, that is gallbladder-less?

Not me.

Reesacat
07-21-10, 05:29 PM
Still have my gall bladder.....I can see if you don't would need extra support.
I seem to do well with all kinds of beans now-we are getting fresh half-runner green beans from my organic farmer that
I can't get enough of! Had fresh okra for the first time (thanks Islander for idea)
sauteed in bacon fat in iron skillet-yum!
Y'all know down heah bacon fat IS a food group!

Aaltrude
07-21-10, 05:33 PM
Oh, Mama! Oats and rice are not grains? I did not know this. Not gluten-containing grains, certainly, but I had thought that most of the food products that we commonly eat as grains, indeed are grains, with the exception of buckwheat, which is a seed of a grass. Please do clarify the part of this that I do not understand. :)

Buckwheat is a member of the Rhubarb family.
The article posted by mellowsong a while back titled "The Dark Side of Wheat" indicated buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth as species suitable "grain" type food.
The article can be found here:
http://www.hawkeshealth.net/community/showthread.php?t=3368

...and here if you don't have time to read the full article, here is the conclusion:

"Eliminating wheat, if not all of the members of the cereal grass family, and returning to dicotyledons or pseudo-grains like quinoa, buckwheat and amaranth, may help us roll back the hands of biological and cultural time, to a time of clarity, health and vitality that many of us have never known before. When one eliminates wheat and fills the void left by its absence with fruits, vegetables, high quality meats and foods consistent with our biological needs we may begin to feel a sense of vitality that many would find hard to imagine. If wheat really is more like a drug than a food, anesthetizing us to its ill effects on our body, it will be difficult for us to understand its grasp upon us unless and until we eliminate it from our diet. I encourage everyone to see celiac disease not as a condition alien to our own. Rather, the celiac gives us a glimpse of how profoundly wheat may distort and disfigure our health if we continue to expose ourselves to its ill effects. I hope this article will provide inspiration for non-celiacs to try a wheat free diet and judge for themselves if it is really worth eliminating".

For the small amount of baking I now eat, I stick to almost exclusively almond flour.

mellowsong
07-21-10, 09:56 PM
I have reservations on #6, given the number of people who are gluten-intolerant...except that oatmeal and brown rice are not grains.

I don't think people need grains...period. Yes, gluten is a definite problem, but grains overall can be harmful both from a blood sugar standpoint and from an anti-nutrient standpoint.

How many of you soak your nuts, legumes and grains prior to preparation (usually in an acidic solution)?

Islander
07-21-10, 10:34 PM
First, to end the suspense, I'm the one with no gall bladder. Had a gallstone for years which never bothered me after the initial attack, but when my oncologist took out other pieces of me she cleaned house and the gall bladder went too. And I can eat & digest anything. I see no difference pre- and post- gall bladder.

I certainly never soak nuts (eww) and no longer eat grains. I always soak dry beans, though, and discard the soak water. Way I was taught. Am I doin it right?

EmmaPeel
07-22-10, 12:29 PM
Interesting. I never have time to soak AND cook beans like chickpeas, navy, kidney because I work outside my home, so I purchase a bean mix.(I know, it's one of the few things I do that is processed). I tried the whole soaking thing, and I usually ended up chucking the works. I do wash & soak my lentils in boiled water for about 30mins., and discard the water before adding them to soup and stew.

Islander you must have a very strong gut, which is GREAT!! When I first had my gallbladder out I could hardly eat anything raw, and too many veg and fruit, or oily meals would send me straight to the bathroom.

I seem to have adjusted over the past 11 years, but I still can't have too many chickpeas and kidney beans. Lentils and white navy are fine.:)

Islander
07-22-10, 02:33 PM
Mostly I do traditional Boston baked beans with salt pork & molasses. I may use yellow eye, soldier, Jacob's cattle or navy beans (a thousand to a plate) but I grow or buy them in quantity in the fall and use them all year. The process is to soak them overnight, discard the water, add fresh, bring to a boil and simmer about an hour or until the skins begn to peel when blown on. Then they go in the bean pot with the rest of the ingredients and bake all day. I've been jonesin for some, but not gonna keep the oven on in this heat!

EmmaPeel
07-22-10, 02:40 PM
Still have my gall bladder.....I can see if you don't would need extra support.
I seem to do well with all kinds of beans now-we are getting fresh half-runner green beans from my organic farmer that
I can't get enough of! Had fresh okra for the first time (thanks Islander for idea)
sauteed in bacon fat in iron skillet-yum!
Y'all know down heah bacon fat IS a food group!

Reesacat, I have about a pound of applewood smoked bacon fat in my freezer from over the winter. How long can I keep this? Hmmm...that gives me an idea for making my gluten free zucchini fritters...! :rolleyes:
Instead of pan frying, use a bit of the fat and bake it instead?!:D

Katee
07-22-10, 06:14 PM
I don't think people need grains...period. Yes, gluten is a definite problem, but grains overall can be harmful both from a blood sugar standpoint and from an anti-nutrient standpoint.

How many of you soak your nuts, legumes and grains prior to preparation (usually in an acidic solution)?

I know i keep quoting him, but i'm so impressed with Dr. Davis of The Heart Scan Blog. He totally agrees with you on the grains. He feels that the type of wheat grown now, & corn (specifically cornstarch), & starches/sugars in general are the big issue with obesity, diabetes, & heart disease.

(He did an experiment with an older grain, something that would have been grown thousands of years ago & only distantly related to the hybrid we now call wheat. He found that in general, this older grain didn't cause the problems that modern wheat does. Tho he frankly admits that his experiment was very limited in scope. Rather a "let's try this & see how it works" on a handful of people.)

His most recent post is this: Why doesn't your doctor try to CURE diabetes? (http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2010/07/why-doesnt-your-doctor-try-to-cure.html) He is on track with Vitamin D3 & so many other things. He believes that diet can reverse heart disease (in many cases) where other docs say only surgery/drugs will do it. And he has had it happen in practice for his patients. He thinks most docs are choosing to close their eyes to the fact that the conventional things they recommend do not help, & actually contribute to more problems. This from a formerly conventional cardiologist who changed his mind when he saw, over & over, that conventional advice doesn't help but makes the situation worse.

DizzyIzzy
07-22-10, 09:22 PM
I soak my nuts and things like lentils and chickpeas.... fwiw. :)

Don't really eat many beans though as such, just not a fan, other than fresh green beans/broad beans/etc out of the garden. Yum. If they're not fresh I can't handle them.

Islander
07-22-10, 09:30 PM
Why soak nuts, please? I mean, half the appeal is the crunchy texture!

Aaltrude
07-22-10, 09:39 PM
Why soak nuts, please? I mean, half the appeal is the crunchy texture!

I agree with you on that one Islander.

Maurya
07-22-10, 10:25 PM
For beans, I soak them overnight, throw out the soaking water, put them with new water directly into the bean pot, and bake for many, many hours, always with several pieces of kombu seaweed. This seems to tenderize the baked beans. Part of the way through the baking, carrots (for sweetness), turnips, previously sauteed onions, and any other handy vegetable goes into the pot to continue to bake in the oven. The pot must be opened occasionally, to check for moisture, adding more water if necessary. Salt is not to be added until very close to the end of cooking.

So, as you can imagine, no baked beans until autumn and winter arrive here. Fresh tomatoes from the garden for now!

DizzyIzzy
07-23-10, 12:35 AM
To activate the good enzymes, make them more digestible, and help reduce the phytate content. It can also help get rid of any contaminants like aflatoxin, theoretically, particularly if you add some kind of natural anti-aflatoxin agent too - though I don't tend to bother, particularly as peanuts are the worst for that and I don't eat peanuts.

This explains it: http://www.raw-food-living.com/soaking-nuts.html

Most of them keep their nice crunchy texture, they're just sort of... nicer. I think anyway. I'll still eat them raw if I can't soak them first (like if I'm needing a snack at uni and pop over to the wholefood store for some or something), but for the most part I have them soaking overnight. Almonds are particularly good soaked.

The trick is not to soak them too long, and to make sure you dry them off before you eat them.

It also makes them easier to blend if you're going to use them for recipes.

Islander
07-23-10, 09:26 AM
The nuts I eat most often are a tablespoon or so of walnuts or sunflower seeds or pignolias in oatmeal or salads. I can't imagine trying to soak quantities that small, especially as I usually decide to add them on the spur of the moment.

Reesacat, I have kept bacon in the freezer for over a year. In fact, I often thaw it, cut it into smaller quantities, and then re-freeze it. (I'm talking about a deep freeze, not a freezer section that defrosts itself periodically; storage time in those is very limited). Your bacon fat should be fine. The very worst that can happen is it will begin to get that stale freezer taste.

mellowsong
07-23-10, 10:36 AM
Why soak nuts, please? I mean, half the appeal is the crunchy texture!

I left part of it out, lol. You soak nuts in salt water, then roast or dehydrate to get the crunch back. There are anti nutrients which are decreased by soaking. Somewhere on here, there is an article called "The Whole Grain Scam". In that article I explained soaking. Also soaking greatly increases digestibility. I need to not post late at night :)

EmmaPeel
07-23-10, 11:58 AM
The nuts I eat most often are a tablespoon or so of walnuts or sunflower seeds or pignolias in oatmeal or salads. I can't imagine trying to soak quantities that small, especially as I usually decide to add them on the spur of the moment.

Reesacat, I have kept bacon in the freezer for over a year. In fact, I often thaw it, cut it into smaller quantities, and then re-freeze it. (I'm talking about a deep freeze, not a freezer section that defrosts itself periodically; storage time in those is very limited). Your bacon fat should be fine. The very worst that can happen is it will begin to get that stale freezer taste.
Thanks for answering my question, Islander. It was I who asked about the frozen bacon.:):)

Islander
07-23-10, 01:26 PM
Thanks for answering my question, Islander. It was I who asked about the frozen bacon.:):)

I see I should not post un-caffeinated. :p