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Maurya
07-25-10, 09:05 AM
From: "WC Douglass, M.D." <realhealth@healthiernews.com>


Feds cut salt levels... again

The war on salt is getting out of hand.

The nanny-state feds are slashing the recommended allowance of this essential mineral yet again, this time by a third to 1,500 mg per day. Eventually, they'll ban it outright so you'll have to buy your seasonings on the black market.

If you think we're unhealthy now, wait until you see what happens then -- because you need your salt, no matter what they say.

And here's what they're saying now: Americans need to cut back on sodium because 70 percent of us have heart disease, diabetes, obesity or some other risk factor such as high blood pressure.

But what they won't tell you is that cutting back on sodium won't make a single person thinner, less diabetic or less prone to heart disease. And no matter what you've heard or read, sodium is rarely responsible for anyone's blood pressure problems, either.

Nod if this is familiar: You walk into your doctor's office and he tells you to cut back on salt to lower your blood pressure. So you spend a month or two eating bland, tasteless foods and live in fear of even the lightest sprinkle of the white stuff.

Then, when you return to the doctor's office, your blood pressure is higher than ever.

You can stop nodding now.

Believe me, you're not alone -- because for most people, salt will help regulate your blood pressure, not raise it.

The only time you'll run into problems with salt is when you start getting the great big piles of it that come in prepackaged foods. But if you stop eating all that junk, you won't have to waste a moment worrying about how much sodium is in your diet.

Maurya
07-25-10, 09:17 AM
While I personally like to take the words of wisdom from Dr Douglass with a large pinch of salt, I do have some curiosity about potassium and sodium. During the past few months, as I have been drinking gallons of water every day, just barely to replace what is lost through perspiration, it has occurred to me (with a bit of a poke from my husband) that perhaps K and Na are being lost excessively as well. Eating a bit more salty food is relatively easy, but increasing the K is a bit different, as it seems to come packaged along with large quantities of carbohydrate in most of its foods. I have tried drinking grapefruit juice and / or low sodium V8, but either of these are quite indigestible, if a volume is consumed that will contain enough K to replenish my dwindling supply. Ordinary goodly amounts of vegetables that I continue to eat might not be sufficient to compensate for the electrolyte loss.

This seems to be the "Gatorade principle" at work, not that I would consume this actual substance itself. Eventually autumn will arrive, but there still are many more weeks of summer in this area. As presumably there will be more summers yet to come in this world, I would appreciate some words of wisdom from our wise members on this topic.

Reesacat
07-25-10, 10:13 AM
Because of your work you might need a potassium supplement-it might be hard to replace with just food.
Mellow would have more information on the best type to get.
Juicing green vegetables is a low carb way to up potassium also. Kale, celery, green peppers, cucumber, romaine lettuc e, apple makes a wonderful drink you can put in thermos and take with you.

EmmaPeel@Work
07-25-10, 11:51 AM
...I have the same problem with keeping my electrolytes up. Drinking gallons of water can also cause something called 'water intoxication' and it can be very dangerous. It has caused the demise of a few marathon runners, because the kidneys cannot handle the volume of water coming in.

Na+, K+, and (Ca+ and Magnesium together) should be constantly recovered if you are in a situation where you sweat out lots of fluids. Reesacat makes a good suggestion, but I think you may need to supplement if you are becoming depleted.

Gotta go...more later.

Islander
07-25-10, 12:24 PM
A question for Maurya, not for idle curiosity but to help her balance electrolytes: do you know that you are literally drinking gallons of water/day? Or is that just an expression?

And a thought about electrolytes: although Gatorade is sweetened with HFCS, my supermarket's generic version of Pedialyte does not. Last time I looked, no sweeteners of any kind.

Maurya
07-25-10, 03:30 PM
A question for Maurya, not for idle curiosity but to help her balance electrolytes: do you know that you are literally drinking gallons of water/day? Or is that just an expression?
As soon as I come out of a boiler, I immediately throw down about three quarts of water, either theirs (if they have a water cooler on the premises) or mine, brought in a small cooler in the car. Another quart or two down the hatch, depending upon how far it is to the next destination. Then several more after I get home. As a person who is known for always needing to pee in the other seasons of the year, in this weather I go all day without needing to hit the head, so all of it must be coming out through my skin.

I like some of the vegetable juice suggestions, and thank you all for every reply! :)

Aaltrude
07-25-10, 04:31 PM
I have to mention my favourite fruit here, bananas - they are a good source of potassium. One banana on average is said to contain 20% more potassium than the normal daily requirement. Eating a banana each day probably wouldn't go amiss though it sounds like your requirement could be higher than average.

mellowsong
07-25-10, 08:02 PM
Maurya,
What you are describing can be part of adrenal fatigue. Besides cortisol, the adrenals make a hormone called aldosterone which, along with other hormones regulates fluid/electrolyte balance. Search here for an article 18 Overlooked symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue.
Do you urinate excessively?
Is your thirst extreme?
Does your pulse jump up when you stand up?
Does your blood pressure fall when you stand up or you get dizzy?
Are symptoms worse in hot weather or when you get hot?

Low aldosterone can make you waste salt. When you waste salt, some potassium is going to go with it. When you have any problem in the fluid/electrolyte systems (kidney, adrenals, pituitary) it affects the whole body. Diabetes insipidus causes similar symptoms but is caused by deficiency of a pituitary hormone.

EmmaPeel
07-25-10, 09:44 PM
As soon as I come out of a boiler, I immediately throw down about three quarts of water, either theirs (if they have a water cooler on the premises) or mine, brought in a small cooler in the car. Another quart or two down the hatch, depending upon how far it is to the next destination. Then several more after I get home. As a person who is known for always needing to pee in the other seasons of the year, in this weather I go all day without needing to hit the head, so all of it must be coming out through my skin.

I like some of the vegetable juice suggestions, and thank you all for every reply! :)

Maurya, I think it is very important that we still pee. ;);)

One would think that if a person does not flush out their bladder on a regular basis they may set themselves up for all kinds of nasty kidney and bladder issues down the road. The bladder is one organ that needs to be 'flushed out' regularly.

Let's think about an Ironman Marathon runner. What happens to their bodies after hours and hours of sweating? How and what do they replenish with?

I know exactly what you mean when you say you are sweating it all out instead of peeing it out. Plain water doesn't sound like it is enough for a body to rehydrate when the expenditure is great.

Just say'n...

Islander
07-25-10, 09:56 PM
As soon as I come out of a boiler, I immediately throw down about three quarts of water...

Honestly, I don't think my stomach would stretch to hold 3 quarts of water. I'm looking at a quart mason jar and thinking, "No way!"

Maurya
07-25-10, 10:55 PM
Do you urinate excessively?
Is your thirst extreme?
Does your pulse jump up when you stand up?
Does your blood pressure fall when you stand up or you get dizzy?
Are symptoms worse in hot weather or when you get hot?
Thanks a lot, Mellowsong for this really interesting information. I vaguely remember having read about these symptoms earlier, but had not reviewed them until you mentioned them. Unfortunately (or fortunately) none of them would seem to apply to me. Nonetheless, I now am curious as to what one would do or should do if there were problems with the adrenals or the pituitary? I am asking, in addition to plain curiosity, as someone might find that they can identify with these symptoms. You really are a wealth of information for the rest of us! :)

Reesacat
07-25-10, 11:33 PM
I would think if it was a problen with adrenals/pituitary your history would be differnt-you would have this problem year round.
But since it is only in summer probably due to heat at work-what temp does it get inside the boilers?

Maurya
07-26-10, 08:47 AM
what temp does it get inside the boilers?
Actually, subsequent to having a conversation with a neighbor, I have obtained a thermometer that I intend to bring into a boiler with me tomorrow. It is not exactly the appropriate type of thermometer, so this will be an experiment. Stay tuned! :)

mellowsong
07-27-10, 11:04 PM
Thanks a lot, Mellowsong for this really interesting information. I vaguely remember having read about these symptoms earlier, but had not reviewed them until you mentioned them. Unfortunately (or fortunately) none of them would seem to apply to me. Nonetheless, I now am curious as to what one would do or should do if there were problems with the adrenals or the pituitary? I am asking, in addition to plain curiosity, as someone might find that they can identify with these symptoms. You really are a wealth of information for the rest of us! :)

Wow that's an incredibly complicated answer and no way to answer it all here, lol. Most of the time YOU have to figure things out for yourself, get the tests done yourself, then try to convince a doc to listen to you. If you suspect adrenal problems, the best thing to do is a salivary cortisol test with hormones (cortisol done at least 4X/day) The rhythm of cortisol production is just as important as the number. A good naturopath or chiropractor can help you get the tests and most have protocols to restore proper function. Before taking even supplements though you have to know if you are low or high cortisol. Both occur in adrenal fatigue and many symptoms overlap. There are good natural treatments for adrenal fatigue but sometimes, if things have progressed very far, natural isn't enough and some people will require hydrocortisone (exactly the same thing your adrenals make) temporarily to allow the adrenals to recover.

There is something called the HPA axis: Hypothalamus/Pituitary/Adrenal. Anything that affects one of those affects the rest. Just one example: If your hypothalamus doesn't produce enough of the hormone that tells the pituitary to produce the hormone to tell the adrenals to make cortisol, you will have adrenal insufficiency...just the same as if you had Addison's disease and your adrenals weren't working. Any link kinked or broken in that chain stops everything. Same thing with thyroid. Your thyroid could be just fine, but the pituitary not make enough of the hormone that tells the thyroid to make thyroid hormone so you end up hypothyroid. The same thing applies when the pituitary or hypothalamus over secrete. Like I said, way to complicated, lol.

Anyway, for some more ideas and where to start, read this article:
http://www.hawkeshealth.net/community/showthread.php?t=1458&highlight=Eighteen

Pituitary problems are a different story. Most of the time more than one hormone is affected. You really need a knowledgeable endocrinologist to figure out pituitary problems. Honestly, I figured it out for myself and it took 11 months of me insisting on certain tests etc to get an endo to agree I have a problem. I have what is called partial diabetes insipidus and am treated with a nasal spray synthetic vasopressin (the hormone I don't make sufficient quantities of) If I wasn't a nurse with a degree in pharmacology, I'd probably still be drinking 6 to 8 quarts of water a day and peeing out more than that. For almost a year they tried to tell me it was psychological.

I know this isn't a very good answer but it's really impossible to cover here.

Maurya
07-28-10, 08:10 AM
I know this isn't a very good answer but it's really impossible to cover here.
This is a wonderful answer! When I get some time, I will follow the links, and allow one thing to lead to another, as we all know how that goes. You have given the curious amongst us a terrifically good start! :)

Maurya
07-30-10, 05:51 PM
Update: The thermometer experiment went bust, as I had failed to take notice of the dead battery in this small digital thermometer that I tried to use. The results would have been less than relevant, however, as the day I had the large water tube boiler was a very cool day for this summer. The ambient temperature was no higher than 90 degrees F (about 32 C) that day, it was fairly cool and comfortable inside that particular boiler.

So my conclusion involves the following: As my situation is an occupational hazard, and as my work week generally is only five days, and as not every work day involves a large boiler internal inspection, and as not every day in the summer has a temperature higher than 100 F, I think that I should just drink my morning smoothie with grapefruit and pineapple juice on those days. A morning smoothie having high protein and high carbohydrate just will not kill my when consumed only occasionally, and when followed by a physically strenuous day (boiler diving). So I now have resolved just to drop my carbophobia and just replenish my electrolytes naturally, in proportion to the necessity for increased water intake.

I so do not regret stirring up this little tempest, as I have learned so much along the way about the human body and its unbelievably complex endocrine system. Great appreciation to all from me! :)

Reesacat
07-30-10, 06:12 PM
You didn't stir up a tempest, Maurya-you asked some very intelligent questions and we had a great discussion.

Sounds like a sensible plan to me:)

EmmaPeel
07-30-10, 10:18 PM
No tempest here! Good discussion. The manner in which you chose to manage your hydration situation is unique to you, which is exactly as it should be. Information is great, but how you apply it should always be contingent on your individual situation ....no one here can ever be in your body but you!:)

bmc65
04-12-11, 01:21 AM
May I suggest coconut water to replenish with? I think of it sort of as nature's gatoraid. Although I don't use it often, I do sometimes give it to my son when he has been running a fever.

Reesacat
04-12-11, 02:19 PM
That is a great idea, bmc65!