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Islander
10-08-10, 09:11 AM
by Frank Will (http://www.helium.com/users/510530/show_articles)


Magnesium deficiency (http://nutrition.helium.com/topic/7182-magnesium-deficiency) is not as big of a problem as some of the other nutrient (http://www.helium.com/items/1425196-magnesium-magnesium-deficiency-benefits-if-magnesium?form_372.replyids=2&form_363.replyids=2&form_346.userid=215&form_346.replyids=8449#) deficiencies, but it is still a major problem if not treated.

The major role of magnesium in the body is in its structure. The adult human body (http://health.helium.com/topic/4639-human-body) contains about 25 grams of magnesium. Over 60% of all magnesium in the body is found in the skeleton, about 27% in muscle, 6% to 7% is found in cells, and less than 1% is found outside of cells.

Magnesium is involved in more than 300 essential metabolic reactions such as energy production, synthesis of essential molecules, structural roles, cell signaling, and cell migration.

The metabolism of carbohydrates and fats to produce energy requires numerous magnesium dependent chemical reactions and it is also is required for a number of steps during nucleic acid (DNA and RNA) and protein synthesis.

Glutathione, an important antioxidant, requires magnesium for its synthesis.

So what exactly is Glutathione?

Glutathione is an extremely interesting and a very small molecule produced by the body and it is found in virtually every cell in the body. There is speculation that this antioxidant helps repair the body from everyday stress, pollution, poor diet and nutrition, aging, as well as trauma.

Magnesium also plays a structural role in bone, cell membranes, and chromosomes, and is required for the active transport of ions, like potassium (http://www.helium.com/items/1425196-magnesium-magnesium-deficiency-benefits-if-magnesium?form_372.replyids=2&form_363.replyids=2&form_346.userid=215&form_346.replyids=8449#) and calcium across cell membranes.

Through its role in ion transport systems, magnesium affects the conduction of nerve impulses, muscle contraction, and normal heart rhythm. Calcium and magnesium levels in the fluid surrounding cells affect the migration of different cell types.

Such effects on cell migration may be important in wound healing, but it may also be associated with aging and trauma, but the research is still out on the overall Glutathione effects enhanced by magnesium.

However, magnesium deficiency (http://nutrition.helium.com/topic/7182-magnesium-deficiency) may impair the process of wound healing and impact the effectiveness of Glutathione.

Interactions do occur with other minerals and vitamins, as high doses of zinc in supplementation form apparently interferes with the absorption of magnesium, and large increases in the intake of dietary fiber (http://www.helium.com/items/1425196-magnesium-magnesium-deficiency-benefits-if-magnesium?form_372.replyids=2&form_363.replyids=2&form_346.userid=215&form_346.replyids=8449#) have been found to decrease magnesium utilization in some studies.

Dietary protein may also affect magnesium absorption, which may also cause magnesium deficiency. The active form of vitamin D (http://nutrition.helium.com/topic/3628-vitamin-d), calcitroil, may slightly increase intestinal absorption of magnesium.

The even distributions that liquid vitamins and minerals (http://www.helium.com/items/1425196-magnesium-magnesium-deficiency-benefits-if-magnesium?form_372.replyids=2&form_363.replyids=2&form_346.userid=215&form_346.replyids=8449#) provide will
assist in these magnesium functions, as magnesium absorption does not seem to be calcitroil dependent as is the absorption of calcium and phosphate.

Magnesium deficiency in healthy individuals who are consuming a balanced diet is quite rare because magnesium is abundant in both plant and animal foods (http://www.helium.com/items/1425196-magnesium-magnesium-deficiency-benefits-if-magnesium?form_346.replyids=8449&form_346.userid=215&form_363.replyids=2&form_372.replyids=2&page=2#) and because the kidneys are able to limit urinary extraction of magnesium when intake is low.

http://tinyurl.com/38kjcvk

Samurai
10-08-10, 01:52 PM
Here's a weird one:
I am thankful that I got pneumonia. Why? Because I was feeling crappy, and someone told me that I should take mag/cal when you got super ill.
I did it, and it has been the best thing since sliced bread.
My sleep has improved tenfold.
I'm lovin' it.... and it's not Micky D's.


Very cool article, Islander. This is a keeper, for sure. :)

Aaltrude
10-08-10, 02:41 PM
Once I finally found a magnesium supplement I could tolerate, I noticed quite a number of improvements as my body slowly reversed a deficient state.

Reesacat
10-08-10, 03:34 PM
I think magnesium deficiency is more widespread than this article suggests. Most people need some supplementation.

mellowsong
10-08-10, 10:27 PM
The normal range for magnesium is set too low...both the bottom of the "normal" range and the top. The vast majority of the US population is truly magnesium deficient.

Ideally, getting a test called RBC or erthryocyte magnesium, will give you an idea of what is really getting to your cells (same goes for potassium). However, serum measurements are fairly good numbers to go on but you need to look at optimal, not normal. For those of you outside the US, I apologize in advance as I have no idea how to convert to your units of measurement.

First of all, the key is getting a doc to test magnesium. When a comprehensive metabolic profile is ordered, magnesium has to be added to it separately and almost never is. Everything I say from here on is aimed at someone with normal kidney function. It is almost impossible to overdose on oral magnesium because you will have massive diarrhea before you absorb enough to become toxic. If there are kidney problems or Addison's disease, that may no longer hold true.

The typical "normal" range for Mg++ is about 1.7 to 2.2mg/dL. A level of 1.7 is woefully inadequate. Optimal Mg levels are probably about 2.2 to 2.8. Symptoms of toxicity don't appear until at least 3.5. So, magnesium is extremely safe to supplement for most people. You simply titrate to bowel tolerance. Keep adding one tablet/capsule/day until you have diarrhea, then back off to the level that doesn't cause diarrhea. As your body becomes less deficient in Mg, the amount that causes diarrhea will decrease.

It is important to avoid Magnesium oxide or magnesium carbonate. These are highly irritating to the GI tract and will cause diarrhea before much actual Mg is absorbed. Mag citrate and glycinate are just a couple of examples or organic salts that are much more readily absorbed. Soaking in Epsom salts is also a good way to supplement Mg. Then there is Magnesium oil, which isn't really oil but super saturated magnesium chloride...this is intended to be applied topically. Epsom salts and magnesium oil will not irritate the GI tract and are good options if you have problems with loose bowels.

I look at Magnesium as almost a miracle supplement and one I wouldn't be without.

Aaltrude
10-08-10, 10:39 PM
The normal range for a lot of lab tests are mathmatical norms rather than clinical norms. Typically a normal range is calculated by testing a large number a supposedly normal population. The outlying results are removed and the normal range is then calculated by taking the mean of the remaining results then adding and subtracting two standard deviations. If the people used for the calculation are not within the optimal range for health (which is highly likely to be the case for magnesium) the so called normal range will not reflect the optimal range for health.

Samurai
10-08-10, 11:26 PM
.
It is important to avoid Magnesium oxide or magnesium carbonate. These are highly irritating to the GI tract and will cause diarrhea before much actual Mg is absorbed.

Mellowsong,
Recently, I bought SolarRay brand with 1,000mg Calcium, and 500mg Mg. That is the dose for four pills, and I only take one at night; it does me well.
But it reads-Calcium (as Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Hydroxide, Calcium Citrate, Calcium Amino Acid Chelate)

Magnesium (as Magnesium Oxide, Magnesium Citrate, Magnesium Amino Acid Chelate)

Glutamic Acid HCL 100mg Is this a derivative of glutamine?

So, are there other ingredients on the list that you disagree with? So, the Magnesium Oxide is bad, huh?

OK what is the best Mg/Ca that money can buy? I also find that this really helps me with the oxalic acids.

Please advise.:confused:

Maurya
10-09-10, 02:57 PM
Just as an anecdote, form one person's experience, the Vitamin Shoppe has their store brand magnesium citrate and calcium citrate, but as separate supplements. I have found taking one of each to be effective for my personal health needs. Don't know how the price would compare with some others, but if you play their game, and do your shopping while they are having one of their periodic sales, the cost seems to be not too bad.

Generally, when the various forms of an ingredient are listed in order, the first one listed would be in the greatest proportion. For example if the ingredients are listed as magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, one then would know that magnesium oxide is present in the largest proportion. Reading the fine print on labels is such a pain, isn't it? But it really is the only way! :)

Islander
10-09-10, 03:29 PM
I take Peter Gillham'sCalm, which I think I mentioned elsewhere. I like it because it's a pleasant drink and because it's powdered, I can tailor it to my needs and cut back when my stools become too soft.

I eat/juice a lot of leafy greens and enough cheese, yugurt etc. that I rarely take supplemental calcium. I'm guessing my needs are met via diet.

mellowsong
10-09-10, 08:34 PM
Mellowsong,
Recently, I bought SolarRay brand with 1,000mg Calcium, and 500mg Mg. That is the dose for four pills, and I only take one at night; it does me well.
But it reads-Calcium (as Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Hydroxide, Calcium Citrate, Calcium Amino Acid Chelate)

Magnesium (as Magnesium Oxide, Magnesium Citrate, Magnesium Amino Acid Chelate)

Glutamic Acid HCL 100mg Is this a derivative of glutamine?

So, are there other ingredients on the list that you disagree with? So, the Magnesium Oxide is bad, huh?

OK what is the best Mg/Ca that money can buy? I also find that this really helps me with the oxalic acids.

Please advise.:confused:

I would not take an Mg supplement containing mag oxide. I also would not take a supplement containing glutamic acid. Glutamine is a naturally occurring amino acid that the brain actually needs but it is pretty hard to be deficient in it. It is an excito-toxin, ie...stimulates the brain. Same with aspartic acid. Just my personal opinion.

I also happen to be of the mind that people probably don't need to supplement calcium except in certain instances/diseases and that calcium supplementation causes more problems than it helps. The balance of Calcium to Magnesium is also essential although there is a lot of disagreement on what the ratio actually should be.

I don't live in your body, so can't advise you personally. I take Mag citrate or Mag glycinate.

Samurai
10-10-10, 09:21 AM
Here's a weird one:
my labs came back very low on glutamine, and Cu (I don't drink the tap water here; tastes like a swimming pool). The two that nobody is low on!
But from what I gather in the article that Islander posted, Magnesium helps make glutamine?
So, why did the Depo-Provera and the bio-identical progesterone rob me of these? The insomnia started immediately after these poisons. I don't get it.
Anyone? Someone? BUT life is good again with my magnesium.... yippie!!!! Life rules.

Lab Doc, have you ever taken Depo Provera? :p kidding.

LabDoc
10-11-10, 07:39 PM
Sam, I am highly insulted by your casting of aspersions on my maleness - Depo Provera indeed!!! (Kidding also).

I am an advocate of the KISS principle, so rather than quote textbook Biochemistry, yes magnesium is involved in glutamine synthesis. I presume you are taking (took) Depo and progesterone as HRT and not for the contraceptive use. The liver metabolizes most sex steroids once they have entered the blood stream and their biological activity is destroyed or much reduced. The metabolites produced are conjugated (bound) with glucuronic acid which makes them water soluble (excretable). Glutamine is a precursor in forming glucuronic acid. Hence metabolizing large amounts of sex steroids could lower glutamine levels significantly. Part of the decarboxylation process involves a diamine oxidase which requires Cu Ions. Low glutamine and Copper levels are a direct result of taking sex steroids and your insomnia is a well recognised side effect of this as Glutamine is also involved in the production of Cortisol and Melatonin.
Healthy green leaf vegetable and some red meat diet should see glutamine and copper levels return.
Hope this helps and wasn't too textbooky.

LabDoc
10-11-10, 10:26 PM
Sam, Glutamic acid HCL is a derivative of Glutamate
Therapeutic Uses :
ADMINISTERED ORALLY AS A SOURCE OF HYDROCHLORIC ACID IN ACHLORHYDRIA DUE TO PERNICIOUS ANEMIA OR OTHER CAUSES, & IN HYPOCHLORHYDRIA. ... DOSE: 600 MG-1.8 G DURING MEALS.
[Osol, A. and J.E. Hoover, et al. (eds.). Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences. 15th ed. Easton, Pennsylvania: Mack Publishing Co., 1975., p. 737] **PEER REVIEWED**
Interestingly, the Sodium salt of this substance is....wait for it...... Yes the dreaded MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE !
I would not take Mag Oxide or Glutamic Acid HCL.
From a Physiology point of view, your body does not need Glutamine supplements as it makes its own. Once other supplements/medications are stopped, Glutamine levels return to normal.
Sorry, meant to include this in above post but got distracted by phone call.