PDA

View Full Version : Salt Strictures in New USDA Dietary Guidelines will Increase Cardiovascular and Other



Islander
02-11-11, 11:28 PM
Salt Strictures in New USDA Dietary Guidelines will Increase Cardiovascular and Other Health Risks

By Morton Satin, Vice President, Science and Research, Salt Institute
February 10, 2011

The public record demonstrates that the previous Dietary Guidelines have not improved the health of consumers, but have instead resulted in confusion and fueled our national obesity epidemic. The 2010 Guidelines are no exception to this pattern.

The Guidelines have become more a reflection of ideology than science. The goal of the 5-year review is to examine all the new evidence with fresh, objective eyes before making recommendations, yet, before the 2010 process began, key members of the Advisory Committee were widely quoted in the press giving their views on the expected outcomes regarding sodium chloride, compromising the process and making the final recommendations a forgone conclusion.

Previous Guidelines made firm recommendations on fat, confidently portraying them as evidence-based, yet had to withdraw them a short time later, when the science proved them wrong. I believe this grim lesson will be repeated with salt.

The recommendation of 1,500 mg sodium comes to less than 4 grams of salt per day. No modern society consumes so little salt, making this proposal nothing less than a call for an uncontrolled trial on more than 300 million Americans. Population-wide interventions to reduce cardiovascular risk only work when there are no negative health consequences – which is clearly not the case with salt reduction. Elevated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone activity resulting from reduced salt consumption will drive the population cardiovascular risk curve to higher levels. Peer-reviewed evidence further suggests the unintended consequences of cognitive impairment, adverse infant neuro-development and increased attention deficits and falls in the elderly.

Low nicotine cigarettes, lite beer, and low fat foods all encouraged greater consumption. Reduced salt in food will worsen the obesity crisis as individuals will consume more simply to satisfy their sodium appetite and their hunger for taste satisfaction. Young children and the 25% of the adult population that are supertasters will make worse food choices because the nutritionally-superior bitter phytochemicals, found in dark green vegetables will not benefit from salt moderation. The latest Nielson figures in the UK indicate that table salt sales have skyrocketed by 18% in the last year, countering all the claimed reductions in processed foods and the notion that people’s tastes can be changed by some bureaucratic fiat.

Healthy humans, all around the world, consume salt within a relatively narrow range controlled by natural physiological mechanisms. Trying to trump biology with unsound policy is pure folly.

This testimony was presented to the USDA and HHS Public Hearing, July 8, 2010

http://tinyurl.com/654c9vl

Islander
02-11-11, 11:32 PM
Obviously the author has a dog in this fight. But again and again in recent weeks, I have seen articles in the popular press about the various kinds of "alternative" salts ("foodie salts?" available. From Himalayan salt to Fleur de Sel to Celtic Sea Salt, the public is becoming increasingly aware of the terrific variety of dazzling mineral-rich salts available — as opposed to the over-refined white table salt.

mellowsong
02-12-11, 02:52 PM
What they are forgetting is the fact that regardless of supposedly "normal" blood tests, the vast majority of the US is potassium deficient. If you take in adequate potassium, the amount of sodium consumed becomes nearly meaningless...as long as the kidneys are healthy. Hypertension responds much better to increased potassium vs lowered sodium.

Aaltrude
02-13-11, 12:44 AM
Hypertension responds much better to increased potassium vs lowered sodium.
Could the potassium I am getting from the two bananas I eat per day be a contributing factor to my normal BP.
I LOVE bananas :D it would be nice to know this is one "addiction" that is actually healthy.

mellowsong
02-13-11, 02:33 PM
Could the potassium I am getting from the two bananas I eat per day be a contributing factor to my normal BP.
I LOVE bananas :D it would be nice to know this is one "addiction" that is actually healthy.

There would be about 900mg K+ in 2 bananas...a significant amount :) Also, with the diet you eat you very likely get way more than the (very much too low) recommended daily amounts. For some reason, my body will not retain potassium even with a potassium rich diet. I am now on a prescription sustained release potassium. I hate taking it but it is working.

bmc65
02-13-11, 03:50 PM
Thanks to you guys recommendations, I've been using Jason's and sometimes Celtic. Celtic is bit more expensive, so I use it more sparingly to switch it up now and agian.
Question, is there any definitive word on Himalayan salt and radiation? Just curious. I don't think I have any troubles with potassium because my BP is pretty good, although I sometimes get some really freaky painful leg cramps when I'm PMS and dehydrated. They aren't like your typical charlie horse. It feels more like my tendons are cramping and it affects opposing sides at the same time.

Aaltrude
02-13-11, 03:59 PM
Information in the book "The Calcium Lie" indicates the two best salts are Celtic and Redmond's. It doesn't mention Himalayan.

I was frequently getting cramps in my toes at night but there are two thing I have found that will prevent this. One is taking an suitable amount of a magnesium supplement and the second is having about an eighth to quarter teaspoon of Redmond's real Salt immediately before going to bed at night. Celtic salt would probably also be OK for this but I happen to have a good supply of Redmond's.

bmc65
02-13-11, 04:35 PM
Thanks Aaltude, I actually meant Redmond's. For some reason I have fixated on the name Jason's. I have no idea why and it's not the first time I've referred to Redmond's as Jason's, go figure.
I feel like I ought to get enough mag, but was wondering. Maybe I'll try a supplement and see what happens.

Islander
02-13-11, 05:27 PM
bmc, funny you should find Celtic more expensive. I get bulk, unrefined Celtic at my nat foods store and it's incredibly cheap. I forget how much, it's been a while, maybe 49¢/lb?

mellowsong
02-13-11, 06:25 PM
bmc, funny you should find Celtic more expensive. I get bulk, unrefined Celtic at my nat foods store and it's incredibly cheap. I forget how much, it's been a while, maybe 49¢/lb?

That's an amazing price!!! Wish I could find it at even $1/lb, lol. I have started buying New Zealand sea salt as it is about 1/2 the price of Celtic and Himalayan at saltworks.com. From what little information I can find, it is supposed to be a pretty pure salt. I got worried about HSS a few years ago when I read about possible radiation. I have no idea if it is true but.... Redmond's has too much iodine in it. I tried it once and immediately was itchy and broke out in bumps.

Aaltrude
02-13-11, 06:25 PM
Redmonds also make a 20 kg block salt as salt licks for animals. It is the same salt as the Redmond's sold for human consumption. This is the salt we buy for our animals and we make sure we break some of the blocks before they are put out for the animals. These pieces we crush up for our own use and hence are able to get our Redmond's salt at a price that is considerably less than what you pay for either human grade Redmond's or Celtic salt, both of which are priced beyond our current means.

Reesacat
02-13-11, 06:28 PM
Thanks Aaltude, I actually meant Redmond's. For some reason I have fixated on the name Jason's. I have no idea why and it's not the first time I've referred to Redmond's as Jason's, go figure.
I feel like I ought to get enough mag, but was wondering. Maybe I'll try a supplement and see what happens.
Swinging shifts and being at the hospital eats up magnesium even if you eat everything organic.
If you crave chocolate could be a sign of low magnesium. Most alternative docs do extra magnesium to bowel tolerance at the first sign of muscle cramps.
I use Peter Gillham's NaturalCalm-fizzy drink you take before going to sleep. Make it with hot water like a tea. Yum! Warning-do not drink this and drive LOL!

bmc65
02-13-11, 11:18 PM
Thanks for the suggestion Reesacat. I'll have to look for it. Thank God it's been me legs cramping and not a vital organ.