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View Full Version : Don't Let Monsanto Buy Out Public Radio!



Islander
05-12-11, 06:08 PM
If you listen to NPR, you might have been surprised to hear a story that ran last week on the program Marketplace that sounded as if it were written by Monsanto itself. The report, entitled "The Non-Organic Future," claimed that the only way to feed the world is to give poor farmers fertilizers, pesticides and genetically modified seeds.

Pedro Sanchez, a proponent of industrial agriculture who works as a soil scientist at Columbia University, is the mouthpiece for the absurd proposition that soil is "like a bank account, you've got to have a positive balance, and if you deposit only organics, you're going to go broke."

In a comment posted at Marketplace's website, Anna Lappé, author of Diet for a Hot Planet, pointed to a gaping hole in their reporting: the failure to acknowledge the 2009 International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science, and Technology for Development (IAASTD) Report, a joint project of the U.N. and the World Bank, among other agencies. Here's Anna's apt description of the report:

"The groundbreaking study brought together 400 experts who worked for 4.5 years to explore the most efficient, productive, and sustainable strategy for feeding the world. The conclusion - quite the opposite of the one reached by those quoted in this segment - stated in no uncertain terms that we must move away from chemical- and fossil[-fuel]-dependent agriculture, which by the way includes biotech.

"Business as usual is not an option, was the radical consensus. Instead, small-scale and mid-scale agroecological farming holds our best hope for feeding the world safe, healthy food, all without undermining our natural capital."

As the IAASTD report shows, Sanchez's view is hardly the only or even the dominant view among development experts about how to "feed the world." Indeed, if there is a consensus, Sanchez's views are in the minority.

Listeners might chalk the whole thing up to sloppy reporting, if it weren't for the fact that over the last couple of years, Marketplace has been underwritten by Monsanto, and the program's been running ads that tout Monsanto as a sustainable agriculture innovator! Rather than being sloppy, it turns out that the reporting is actually a carefully constructed thank-you gift for a prized advertiser!

If you find this type of corporate influence and media bias unacceptable, please ask American Public Media, producers of Marketplace, to stop spreading Monsanto's lies.
Take Action (http://capwiz.com/grassrootsnetroots/utr/1/KDSDPTRJXY/OONZPTUIXS/6880848371)

http://tinyurl.com/64o82z8

Reesacat
05-12-11, 07:38 PM
Done!

Julieanne
05-13-11, 04:50 AM
This all sounds very familiar - remember the 'Green Revolution' of the 60's? Didn't work then, won't work now.

Islander
05-13-11, 08:40 AM
I've been a huge fan of public radio for 25 years or more, but this embracing of corporate biotech is the biggest outrage in a series of recent outrages, as the network seems to be leaning (at least locally) more to the right from what used to be an unbiased position.

bmc65
05-13-11, 03:07 PM
Thanks, I also got this via email and signed it. If this keeps up, NPR and PBS are going to have to drop the P for public and use a C for corporate, or perhaps an S for sellout.

Pattypans
05-13-11, 03:48 PM
If this keeps up, NPR and PBS are going to have to drop the P for public and use a C for corporate, or perhaps an S for sellout.
Well said.

Maurya
05-13-11, 09:18 PM
Thanks, I also got this via email and signed it. If this keeps up, NPR and PBS are going to have to drop the P for public and use a C for corporate, or perhaps an S for sellout.

Excellent point, bmc! One must remember not to bite the hand that feeds it. In this case most of the "feeding" is done not by state or federal government, and not by individual subscribers, but by corporate sponsors. Regardless of whether a program has blatant commercials or more tasteful, quiet messages from the corporate sponsor, the editorial content is influenced by the main providers of money.

bmc65
05-14-11, 01:34 PM
Maybe I wasn't paying attention before, but I've definitely noticed a slant in PBS's content. For starters there was that Frontline episode on vaccines where the only representation from "the better safety" camp was Jenny McCarthy. I've also noticed more NOVA episodes with a military theme, and I turned off one news show that was touting the benefits of GMO's.