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mellowsong
06-30-11, 03:33 PM
By Dr. Michael Cutler on 06/30/2011
Dear Dr. Cutler,

Recently, I’ve read online that fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome are similar, but that chronic fatigue doesn’t produce much pain.

The treatment protocol the article suggested was guaifenesin. I’ve had my heart, thyroid and testosterone checked and all three are normal, but I’m afraid I possibly have chronic fatigue or fibromyalgia symptoms.

For the last several months, I’ve been taking a CoQ10 supplement to boost my energy. However, my symptoms seem to be getting worse. Do you have any suggestions for me?
—Herbert M.
Read more: http://www.healthiertalk.com/does-coq10-help-fibromyalgia-4205

mellowsong
06-30-11, 03:34 PM
Not sure why this questioner thinks CFIDS doesn't produce much pain as musculoskeletal pain is a significant symptom in CFIDS.

Aaltrude
06-30-11, 05:10 PM
Not sure why this questioner thinks CFIDS doesn't produce much pain as musculoskeletal pain is a significant symptom in CFIDS.

Is the pain in CFIDS patients due to the CFIDS or could it be comorbid FM as often patients will be suffering from several of these multi system illnesses. It is this link between them that started Dr Martin Pall looking for a common cause.

Reesacat
06-30-11, 05:34 PM
Well, pain is a major part of CFIDS-it feels like the aches and pains from the worst flu you can imagine.
I wonder if the poster didn't realize it was part of the illness-a layperson reading about the 2 illnesses may read the emphasis on FM being diagnosed by looking at the pain, the trigger points, and treatment of medications for pain and not pick up on pain being a major problem in CFIDS.
From the CFIDS list of symptoms:http://www.cfids.org/about-cfids/symptoms.asp
CFS is characterized by incapacitating fatigue (experienced as profound exhaustion and extremely poor stamina) and problems with concentration and short-term memory. It is also accompanied by flu-like symptoms such as pain in the joints and muscles, unrefreshing sleep, tender lymph nodes, sore throat and headache. A distinctive characteristic of the illness is post-exertional malaise, a worsening of symptoms following physical or mental exertion occurring within 12-48 hours of the exertion and requiring an extended recovery period.