PDA

View Full Version : U.S. could bring more common drugs over the counter



Islander
03-10-12, 03:01 PM
By Anna Yukhananov
WASHINGTON | Thu Mar 8, 2012

(Reuters) - Prescription drugs to treat some of the most common chronic diseases, such as high cholesterol and diabetes, may become available over the counter under a plan being considered by U.S. regulators.

In what would be a major shift in policy if finalized, the Food and Drug Administration is seeking public comment until Friday on a way to make these medications more readily available. It will also have a meeting about the proposal at the end of March.
The goal is to ensure people take drugs as needed, while still understanding safety issues.

Read more: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/08/us-fda-drugs-otc-idUSBRE8270TG20120308?feedType=RSS&feedName=healthNews

Islander
03-10-12, 03:02 PM
I've a busy weekend so I'll let you tear your hair out in my place.

Reesacat
03-10-12, 03:06 PM
They want to make STATINS OTC?!!!!!::::::runs away screaming::::::::

highlander
03-10-12, 08:50 PM
Quite a strategic war on drugs, right?

StephenX
03-10-12, 09:26 PM
The next step will be to severely limit supplements. Nous devons être attentifs

Samurai
03-10-12, 10:30 PM
Nous devons être attentifs
Dude. I only know the languages of the plebeians; Texan, Spanish, and Spanglish. What does that mean???

Aaltrude
03-10-12, 10:43 PM
Dude. I only know the languages of the plebians; Texan, Spanish, and Spanglish. What does that mean???
We must be attentive.

StephenX
03-10-12, 10:43 PM
We must be vigilant

Islander
03-10-12, 11:57 PM
[Puts on Admin hat]
We have almost 1500 regular members and over 10,000 unique visitors to this site monthly. Not all of them are native English speakers, but English is the language of the site. I know it's fun to show off our multiculturism, linguistic abilities and familiarity with Google Translate, Bing, or Morse Code...but let's please be courteous and keep to English as the default language. Thank you.
[Removes Admin hat]

StephenX
03-18-12, 02:55 PM
[Puts on Admin hat]
We have almost 1500 regular members and over 10,000 unique visitors to this site monthly. Not all of them are native English speakers, but English is the language of the site. I know it's fun to show off our multiculturism, linguistic abilities and familiarity with Google Translate, Bing, or Morse Code...but let's please be courteous and keep to English as the default language. Thank you.
[Removes Admin hat]

It could be worse. I speak German, Russian, Spanish, Lakota and some French. Who needs Google translate? Oh yeah, I admit I needed it for the Lithuanian.. I will translate as I go from now on. Akita mani yo! (observe while walking...learn while living) dahdit dahdahdah dahdah dahdahdah ditdahdit ditditdit dit dahditdahdit dahdahdah dahditdit dit? dahdahdah ditditditdit dahdah dahditdahdah (November Oscar Mike Oscar Romeo Sierra Echo Charley Oscar Delta Echo? Oscar Hotel Mike Yankee). No Morse code? Oh my. :) :)

highlander
03-18-12, 06:31 PM
I'm unilingual. banghead :o
When I grow up, I'm going to learn Japanese just for the hell of it. Gaelic and Lakota or Cherokee would be awesome too. Pray for me. I came from a family and culture that would cock their head sideways and ask "why would you want to do that?"

Reesacat
03-18-12, 06:58 PM
That is a very common attitude in the US. People will travel abroad and not even learn to say Thank You in the language of the place they are visiting.

StephenX
03-18-12, 08:55 PM
My Russian teacher asked me "what do you call someone who speaks two languages...bilingual. What do you call someone who speaks several languages...multilingual. What do you call someone who speaks one language?...an American." Don't blame me, blame her. :)

Islander
03-18-12, 09:59 PM
I speak German, Russian, Spanish, Lakota and some French. Who needs Google translate? Oh yeah, I admit I needed it for the Lithuanian..
Stephen, if you are truly fluent in six languages I would have to doff my cap to you as a polymath. That's a huge accomplishment, and I say that as a person who has an aptitude for languages. I'm only conversant in two, though I can read more than I can speak...but multilingual ability is not a defining characteristic of intelligence. Many of our regulars have jaw-dropping expertise in areas that only rarely come to light on this site.

I agree with Reesacat: when I travel, I take the time to learn at least a handful of the basic phrases one needs in the native language. It's just common courtesy. I was even able to do this in Cantonese and Mandarin, in China and Hong Kong. And in many places, if you rent a car and buy a good road map you can read the highway signs well enough to get to your intended destination (except in Wales where alas, they have no vowels...and you THINK they are speaking English).

Iceland, on the other hand, is a mass of contradictions. The Icelandic language has been preserved for a thousand years — which means that one can read the original eddas, but due to family nomenclature, phone books are a living nightmare and highway signs are a challenge. OTOH, in an Asian country a Westerner stands out; in Rejkavik, tourists stopped me on the street to ask me if I spoke English. Why yes, of course— but so does every native under 60!

StephenX
03-18-12, 10:24 PM
Thanks, I think. In 1970 my linguistic skills got me recruited by guys in grey suits rather than by guys in brown uniforms. Language has always been easy for me. I do not think it's any big thing. Learning is a life long endeavor. I'm still working on my language skills. I started to learn Lakota when I was 60 because I read some "expert" say that people my age cannot learn a new language. I thought "tonkiche pte! (bull poop!), I can do this. Shunghilaska emachiyab (my name is White Fox). I still think selling statins over the counter is ludicrous. What's next amphetamines? Oxycontin? Yet people are put in prison for using an herb...madness!

Islander
03-18-12, 10:38 PM
Because languages come easily to me, and because I travel a lot, one of my biggest regrets is the stupidity of a shooting accident that ruined my hearing. Language tapes and even human voices have now become hard to decipher. No, it won't deter me from further travel...just adds an obstacle.

Stephen, I seriously wish the suits would contact me. As a savvy but apparently harmless old lady with frozen chickens in her carry-on bags (true story, delayed because LaGuardia was fogged in, chix thawing), I think I have a few usable skills. Suggestions welcome. Peem me if you have some.

StephenX
03-18-12, 10:51 PM
Stephen, I seriously wish the suits would contact me. As a savvy but apparently harmless old lady with frozen chickens in her carry-on bags (true story, delayed because LaGuardia was fogged in, chix thawing), I think I have a few usable skills. Suggestions welcome. Peem me if you have some.

Speaking Farsi and Arabic is the big thing these days. It is not a good life. For the most part it is dangerous and miserable.

Katee
03-19-12, 03:22 PM
I'm in awe of y'all's linguistic abilities. I speak American and Southern English.

I meant to comment on this article last week, but then got home & couldn't access HH anymore. Evidently the server was able to fix the problem, and here i am again!

It doesn't surprise me that they want to make statins & other things OTC. Look at the way the proton pump inhibitors (PPI) - Prilosec and the like - took off when they made them OTC. I know someone who practically lives on those drugs. I hate to think of what the drugs are doing to his body, how that he won't be getting any nutrients from his food as he has no stomach acid to break down the (junk) he eats. Also, many doctors are still ignorant of the reality of these drugs. I have heard doctors say, "Statins are so good everyone should be on them. They should be in the water like fluoride." Well, don't get me started on fluoride in the water!

How can they make these things OTC, though? They need to be monitored - cholesterol levels and the like - in order to titrate dosages. Of course, some docs believe that cholesterol should be as low as possible and wouldn't see that blood tests are necessary.

I have said before, when i was in college i worked for a doctor and that was just before they began direct advertising of drugs to people. I was firmly entrenched in conventional medicine at that time. I was a proponent of direct advertising, just as i would have been of making most drugs OTC. My intent/reasoning was good, but i didn't understand the reality of the situation.

I thought that direct advertising would mean more information to the patient so that they could make informed decisions and be more responsible for their own health care rather than leaving it to the doctors. I didn't understand that the marketing done to doctors - and now to patients as well - is misdirection and misinformation. No one can make informed decisions based on the info provided by the drug companies.

My real intent was for more people to be active in their health care decisions and not to rely so much on the "expert" doctor opinion. I had already had too much experience with doctors that ignored or discarded important information given them by the patient. I had the wrong end of the stick. I now believe exactly the same thing, but medications aren't part of the picture for me. I may consult a doctor and take their recommendations into account, but i am responsible for my health and the decision for what to put in my body. I've also learned to treat most things from home with natural supplements and herbs, etc. These natural products are powerful - but sometimes don't act as quickly as the synthetic medications - but also without the dangers and side effects.

I still believe that the healthiest choices are to be active in our health care choices, but a doctor who believes drugs are the answer isn't going to be someone to partner with to make good decisions.

Katee
03-19-12, 03:31 PM
I meant to say, too, that i think it is beyond bizarre that the FDA could remove something as harmless as homeopathic hCG, but it looking to put these dangerous drugs on the market as OTC, so that any person could buy them without fully understanding the dangers.

banghead

Too many people believe that if a drug is approved by the FDA it is "safe" and fully tested. NOT.

Islander
03-19-12, 08:50 PM
Well said, Katee.