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Thread: Researchers Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity; Have Now Shown doesn't exis

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    Default Researchers Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity; Have Now Shown doesn't exis

    Curious to know what our members think about this.

    JENNIFER WELSH
    MAY 15, 2014

    In one of the best examples of science working, a researcher who provided key evidence of (non-celiac disease) gluten sensitivity recently published follow-up papers that show the opposite.
    The first follow-up paper came out last year in the journal Gastroenterology. Here's the backstory that makes us cheer:

    The study was a follow up on a 2011 experiment in the lab of Peter Gibson at Monash University. The scientifically sound — but small — study found that gluten-containing diets can cause gastrointestinal distress in people without celiac disease, a well-known autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten. They called this non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Keep reading: http://www.businessinsider.com/glute...ication-2014-5
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    Default Re: Researchers Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity; Have Now Shown doesn't

    Interesting food for thought.

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    Veteran Member Reesacat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Researchers Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity; Have Now Shown doesn't

    Chris Kresser talks about this study in his podcast/transcript provided at
    http://chriskresser.com/new-ibs-fodm...lopecia-areata

    "This other study, though, showed that a gluten-free diet, while it does help with IBS, it doesn’t help IBS patients that are already on a low-FODMAP diet. They took a bunch of patients, put them on a low-FODMAP diet, which we’ve talked about before. FODMAP stands for “Fermentable Oligosaccharide, Disaccharide, Monosaccharide, And Polyols,” and they’re basically specific types of carbohydrates or sugars that are not well absorbed in the digestive tract, and then they can linger around and become food for pathogenic gut bacteria, and if SIBO is present, small intestine bacterial overgrowth, which is one of the causes of FODMAP intolerance, eating a lot of FODMAPs can make it worse, and then studies have shown that removing or greatly restricting FODMAP intake can have a profound effect on IBS. In fact, I think some studies have shown up to 75% to 80% of patients improve, which is way, way better than any drug treatment for IBS.


    So they were randomly assigned to groups, and they were all on a low-FODMAP diet. But then there was one group that was placed on a high-gluten diet with 16 grams of gluten per day. And there was another group that was on a low-gluten diet, and that was 2 grams of gluten per day and 14 grams of whey protein a day. And then there was another group on a control diet with 16 grams of whey protein a day. And then they assessed different markers of intestinal inflammation and immune activation and then different ways of measuring fatigue. And this was a crossover study, so 22 of the patients then crossed over and ended up in a different group, so the patients that were on the low-gluten group went into the high-gluten group and vice versa. And that’s a good way of doing a study like this. It just strengthens the results. If you find, for example, that patients in each case that were on the low-gluten diet did better rather than just one group of patients, it strengthens the results.


    As suspected, the low-FODMAP diet universally reduced symptoms in everybody, regardless of whether they were eating gluten or not eating gluten. But reintroducing gluten once FODMAPs were already really restricted didn’t cause any problems in this particular study group. So there was no difference in symptoms in people on a low-FODMAP diet who were taking supplemental gluten and people that were on a low-FODMAP diet and weren’t taking gluten.


    This is certainly interesting. I mean, does this mean that we should eat gluten? I don’t think so – you may not be surprised to hear me say that – for a few reasons: Number one, these results actually directly contradict a previous study that the same researchers did. It was a placebo-controlled study where they gave patients capsules, some with gluten and some with a placebo powder that didn’t have any gluten in it. And these patients were also already on a fairly low-FODMAP diet, and they did that to kind of reduce any background noise because these researchers knew that FODMAPs can trigger or exacerbate IBS symptoms. And in that study, the patients who did receive gluten had more symptoms and were worse off than the patients who didn’t. So there are two completely different results there."

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    Default Re: Researchers Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity; Have Now Shown doesn't

    Steve Wright and Chris Kresser go on to discuss it further:

    "Steve Wright: Well, it’s also interesting to think about what you just hit on there, which is that there are lots of other substances in wheat. We know that gluten is an issue for a certain percentage of people, there are also WGA and lots of other protein compounds that could be very reactive to these people. They just tested gluten, which might be good or bad, but they definitely didn’t test the entire compound of wheat.

    Chris Kresser: That’s right. That’s a great point. Actually in the first article of the Beyond Paleo series, which you always mention at the beginning of the show, I talk about all those different compounds, proteins in wheat and how many people can be sensitive to wheat germ agglutinin or other agglutinins or other types of gliadin that aren’t typically measured, so definitely that could be one issue. But like I said, from a practical perspective and a clinical perspective, most of my patients with gut issues not only do better without gluten-containing grains, they just do better without grains altogether. Some of my patients do fine with properly prepared grains, like in the Weston A. Price tradition, but I would say the vast majority of my patients with gut issues can’t even tolerate those very well, and they just seem to make the gut inflammation worse. There aren’t a lot of comparative studies on patients with gut issues that are doing properly prepared soaked and fermented grains versus typical processed grains or even whole grains that aren’t soaked and prepared that way, and there probably never will be, and that’s where we rely on clinical experience and even anecdotal reports.


    Steve Wright: Yeah, I would add in about another 10 to 20 thousand reports from my experience over the last four years talking with people with gut issues.


    Chris Kresser: Yeah. But as always, my recommendation is to go a period of time without any of that stuff, and then if you really want to try it and add it back in, go for it and see how it works. And like Steve and I are saying, in most cases it doesn’t work very well, but if you’re one of those few cases where you can tolerate it, then there isn’t a ton of research that shows that eating soaked and fermented whole grains is going to really contribute to any diseases. There just isn’t a lot of research that implicates those foods in modern disease. Certainly in populations that are eating a large portion of their calories from grains, as happened in the early transition to agriculture from hunter-gatherer societies in some parts of the world, that’s going to be a big problem because grains are much less nutrient dense than animal products and vegetables and fruits and nuts and seeds. And so if you are eating the majority of your calories from grains, you’re going to end up being nutrient deficient, and that’s what happened with a lot of those populations. But if you’re eating a small amount of properly prepared soaked, fermented grains, which breaks down the phytic acid, which is what inhibits some of the absorption of the nutrients in grains, in the context of an overall very nutrient-dense diet, like a paleo diet, there’s little evidence that suggests that would be harmful in terms of promoting disease. Like I’ve said, my clinical experience suggests that people with gut issues and also autoimmune disease who already have chronic diseases do better even without those foods, but that doesn’t mean that they contribute to the modern disease epidemic. I think that’s a bit of a stretch, people who have made those claims."

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    Default Re: Researchers Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity; Have Now Shown doesn't

    Thank you for that wealth of information, Reesacat!
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    Default Re: Researchers Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity; Have Now Shown doesn't

    I really don't care what science "says" when it comes to diet. If you take it out and feel better....there's your answer. I was going to say that there are so many other problematic compounds in wheat and really all grains, that removing gluten alone isn't going to give answers...but Reesacat covered that.

    Although not gluten, here's a really good example. My 8 y/o grandson has been tested over and over and over for corn allergy (skin and blood tests) and of course always negative. Yet, if he gets the most minute exposure to corn, even in the form of HFCS, he gets a rash but what is really significant is his behavior. He gets totally out of control. Recently he ate a pickle that probably had HFCS. For the next week and 1/2 he went, literally crazy. The school made his mom come get him because he was so wild. He is in a karate class with an instructor who specializes in ADHD and other behavior problems and he had to leave that week. He decided it was fine to take his poop and smear it all over himself and everything else and laugh. I could go on, but even in light of all this, the doctors tell my daughter that he cannot be reacting to corn. Her husband bought into that for a long time and kept giving him stuff but eventually he realized there really is a connection.

    The point of this story is that science does not know everything and you HAVE to listen to your body.
    Last edited by mellowsong; 05-17-14 at 10:29 AM.

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