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Thread: Dutch saltwater potatoes offer hope for world's hungry

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    Administrator Islander's Avatar
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    Default Dutch saltwater potatoes offer hope for world's hungry

    Maude Brulard
    April 29, 2015

    A small field on an island off the Netherlands' northern coast promises one answer to the problem of how to feed the world's ever-growing population: potatoes and other crops that grow in saltwater.
    /4988204/Phys_Story_InText_Box
    Every day, swathes of farmland somewhere in the world become unusable because of salty soil, but farmers on windswept Texel are finding solutions using traditional methods.
    The team headed by farmer Mark van Rijsselberghe has planted around 30 types of potato and their approach is simple: anything that dies in the saline environment is abandoned, and anything that lives "we try to follow up on," said Van Rijsselberghe. "It's faster."
    The experiments do not just target potatoes, but also look at how other crops grow in saltwater, including carrots, strawberries, onions and lettuce.

    Read more: http://phys.org/news/2015-04-dutch-s...ld-hungry.html
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    Veteran Member grulla's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dutch saltwater potatoes offer hope for world's hungry

    HAH! I saw that on the news just yesterday or the day before and meant to report it here on HH, but forgot. You snooze, you lose. LOL!

    I love hearing of the possibilities of growing (certain) crops, mostly tubers I think, in brine or seawater. Most of what was reported was in the Netherlands, Pakistan, and perhaps other places, can't remember. Great stuff! "Islander", how far are you from the ocean? LOL Gotta read your link ASAP, as soon as time permits.

    Not too long ago, it was reported on the news here in NM that a vast semi-saline aquifer was discovered in east central NM. I wonder if it could be used to farm certain crops??? I believe this is the correct link: http://www.crmwa.com/lake-meredith-s...ontrol-project
    Last edited by grulla; 10-05-16 at 06:22 PM.

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    Veteran Member grulla's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dutch saltwater potatoes offer hope for world's hungry

    Finally found the time to read this most interesting article. I wonder if this salinity agriculture could help California's Central Valley farmers/growers? And they have much more problems than salinity, like nitrates. http://www.watereducation.org/post/s...itical-problem

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    Default Re: Dutch saltwater potatoes offer hope for world's hungry

    Well, first, California would need water. As in, rain. But that's a good question, Grulla. I'm surprised you heard it only recently in the news. The story is a year old and I found it by mere accident.
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    Veteran Member grulla's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dutch saltwater potatoes offer hope for world's hungry

    Quote Originally Posted by Islander View Post
    Well, first, California would need water. As in, rain. But that's a good question, Grulla. I'm surprised you heard it only recently in the news. The story is a year old and I found it by mere accident.
    Rain water or not, that soil salinity is/was the result of pumping huge amounts of deep well water for irrigation of commercial crops.

    Also, yes, your news article was new to me. But from other news sources in the past, I have always had a fascination and interest in the possibility of growing crops in brackish, brine, and/or salty sea water. One thing that really caught my attention and interest in your article was that the salt in the tuber plant accumulated in the leaf, and not in the tuber itself. Great stuff, could solve huge food problems if Fukishima doesn't cause problems. Will have to spend more time at the beach, LOL.

    Here are examples of non food, dune controlling, vegetation, but plant growth none-the-less: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_dune_stabilization

    And yes, that news ditty appeared on the TV news just a few days ago about the Dutch botanist and his endeavors. Guess it may have been an update???
    Last edited by grulla; 10-07-16 at 09:35 AM.

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