Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Copper Hospital Beds Kill Bacteria, Save Lives

  1. #1
    Moderator Julieanne's Avatar
    Join Date
    18th April 2011
    Location
    Roleystone, Western Australia
    Posts
    5,085

    Default Copper Hospital Beds Kill Bacteria, Save Lives

    American Society For Biology
    November 8 2019

    A new study has found that copper hospital beds in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) harbored an average of 95 percent fewer bacteria than conventional hospital beds, and maintained these low-risk levels throughout patients' stay in hospital. The research is published this week in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.


    Read more: https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1108132428.htm

  2. #2
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,389

    Default Re: Copper Hospital Beds Kill Bacteria, Save Lives

    Covering surfaces in copper can't be cheap... cost-prohibitive?
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

  3. #3
    Veteran Member grulla's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2012
    Location
    Grant County, NM
    Posts
    1,399

    Default Re: Copper Hospital Beds Kill Bacteria, Save Lives

    That's very interesting. I wonder what parts of the beds were made of copper, or perhaps electro-copper plated. If copper, a pricey commodity, is sold in 4' X 8' sheets like most other sheet and plate metals, as well as plywood, then perhaps a thin sheet of copper under one's mattress might work well???

    The copper mining industry, formerly Phelps-Dodge, and now known as Freeport-McMoran, is a huge regional industry not too far from where I live. When I lived back in PA from 1977-1983, I built my own masonry chimney from the cellar floor up through an unused closet in the middle of the house to and through the attic and the roof, and had a local sheet metal shop fabricate copper sheet metal flashing to my specs, which engaged the 16" mortared concrete chimney blocks to the shingling of the roof. Copper is impervious to adverse wet weather condition and over time self-protects itself to an oxidized green without any adverse side effects. But I'm not sure indoor oxidation would be a problem or even happen in the first place unless there is a moisture problem around one's copper bed, and even then it should be easy to clean with a mild abrasive.
    Last edited by grulla; 4 Weeks Ago at 11:51 AM.

  4. #4
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,389

    Default Re: Copper Hospital Beds Kill Bacteria, Save Lives

    Grulla, you built a "masonry chimney." I'm impressed! We built two, using Scott and Helen Nearing's method, in our passive solar home. I'm curious about two things: what "masonry" materials did you use? And how did you line your chimney?

    Afterthought/edit: would the area under the mattress be a likely spot for bacterial growth? The hospital references were to areas constantly touched by human hands, IIRC.
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member grulla's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2012
    Location
    Grant County, NM
    Posts
    1,399

    Default Re: Copper Hospital Beds Kill Bacteria, Save Lives

    Quote Originally Posted by Islander View Post
    Grulla, you built a "masonry chimney." I'm impressed! We built two, using Scott and Helen Nearing's method, in our passive solar home. I'm curious about two things: what "masonry" materials did you use? And how did you line your chimney?...
    Circa 1980, first I cut a 4' X 4' hole through the concrete cellar floor with a masonry cut-off wheel for the chimney foundation, with a hand held skill saw, and dug down one foot deep, added steel rebar for all the concrete poured into that chimney foundation hole, and set the first 16" X 16" X 8" concrete chimney block into the wet cement, and waited almost two weeks for that to cure, set, and harden.

    After that, enough concrete chimney blocks were purchased for about a 25' OAH chimney with terracotta lined chimney tile flue sections. Two holes were provided, one for a cleanout hatch a foot or so above the floor, and of course the other for the stove pipe connecting the hard anthracite coal (popular in that part of PA) burning cast iron caboose stove to the chimney. Having that arrangement in the cellar with the chimney rising through the middle of the house, (as opposed to being outdoors) really made for an efficient operation heating the small 1000 sq' ranch house very well with even the chimney waste heat through the inside walls.

    If I had decided to burn wood instead of coal, the risk of creosoting that chimney would have been minimal cuz no outdoor cold temperatures would have had an adverse condensing effect chilling that indoor chimney. The grate had to be shook twice a day, so a shop vacuum cleaner hose was held close to the stove door while shaking the grate to keep all the dust from entering the house. And I suppose a 6" or 8", 1/8" thick wall, steel well casing pipe could have been used in place of the terracotta for a chimney flue liner.
    Last edited by grulla; 4 Weeks Ago at 08:31 AM. Reason: added the word 'concrete blocks' 3 times

  6. #6
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,389

    Default Re: Copper Hospital Beds Kill Bacteria, Save Lives

    Thanks for the info. Now, what are "chimney blocks"? Cement? Something else? Both of ours are fieldstone, so I have to ask. As for wood & creosote, both of our chimneys are indoors and I have to tell you, if you can't burn a "hot, clean" fire, creosote will form. And if you want to hold a fire overnight, you do have to shut it down!
    I had to smile at the thought of a coal-burning stove. We had a coal-fired furnace down cellar when I was a child, but for 40 years in Maine we burn wood, of course!
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member grulla's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2012
    Location
    Grant County, NM
    Posts
    1,399

    Default Re: Copper Hospital Beds Kill Bacteria, Save Lives

    Yes, they are 8" X 16" X 16" or 20" concrete blocks that look like the same material as modern day so called "cinder" blocks. A lot of builder supplies and concrete fabricators sell them. A few years ago, I located and purchased 140+ surplus, (hard to find in this immediate area), 8" X 16" X 16" concrete chimney blocks at a discount price , some of which I stacked loosely (no mortar) below ground to protect the many underground irrigation line water faucet risers, which have fabricated steel plate covers at the surface to protect against freezing, or from someone or a horse/dog/or other animal from breaking a leg.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Oxygen Particles Injected Into Blood Could Save Lives
    By mellowsong in forum Health and Medical Breakthroughs
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-05-12, 11:50 PM
  2. Vitamin C Could Save 200,000 Lives/Year
    By mellowsong in forum Vitamin C
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-22-11, 11:51 AM
  3. Mammograms don't save as many lives as women think
    By Islander in forum Women's Health
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-25-11, 12:43 PM
  4. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 02-04-10, 01:15 AM
  5. Why mammograms don't save lives
    By Islander in forum Cancer
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-03-09, 11:41 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<<<<<<<< Your Customized Value <<<<<<<<