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Thread: Adjusting to lifelong medications

  1. #1
    Senior Member BandsAiud's Avatar
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    Default Adjusting to lifelong medications

    What were the challenges you faced when your Dr. put you for your lifelong medication? Was the transition easy? Feel free to share it here.

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    Default Re: Adjusting to lifelong medications

    When I was first diagnosed, I had a lot going on. High BP, a large Basal Cell Carcinoma that needed a graft, very obese. My heart rate was 120 just sitting in the doctor's office and my BP was 180/110. The only reason the doctor let me go home was because I wasn't showing any symptoms to support a trip to the ER. After the labs came back, I learned I had Type 2 diabetes.

    The surgery I needed required me to be fully anesthetized. I was told flat out, this was a no go. I would probably die on the table.

    That was my wake up call. I have seen what ignoring diabetes can do to friends and family.

    It took about a month to find sites where I can fit and tell my story and learn from others too and, frankly, I was extremely skeptical of the advice I can find online. Especially with all the "doom and gloom" I thought I knew about diabetes. I figured I had nothing to lose. With so much going on, I decided to try and work on my glucose since it seemed the easiest. I adopted a diet that would probably best be described as keto, got a FitBit, and committed to 10000 steps a day. It was tough mentally and physically. My glucose went down to normal within 6 months and I was lost 50 pounds. The success encouraged me to keep on going. The doctor was amazed. I was able to have that surgery. My BP became good. Really, just taking the steps to control diabetes seemed like hitting a reset button. Everything became better as my glucose levels dropped.

    Now, 5 years later, it is all habit. I eat the things I know are good for me. I got into cycling long distance. I was running for a while, but I HATE running. My doctor joked I just had to visit once a year like healthy people do. At first, it was every 3 or 4 months. I lost 100 pounds. I gained some back in muscle but my weight is stable now. At this point, I really don't think much about it because it is controlled. I visit this site becasue I have made friends here.

    While I don't present as a diabetic, I am clearly insulin resistant. If I ever doubt that, all I need is some cake or pie. I go up to about 140 and stay there for 3 or 4 hours then have a reactive hypoglycemia

  3. #3
    Moderator Julieanne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Adjusting to lifelong medications

    Congratulations on all you have achieved! It sounds as though you are doing everything right, and that takes real willpower. Did you ever take any medication?

  4. #4
    Senior Member BandsAiud's Avatar
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    Default Re: Adjusting to lifelong medications

    Everyone has different struggles however in my opinion: the hardest thing for me is to work out the insulin ratio which is different from what each person and carb calculating. However, it's thanks to my diabetic team who helps me with the ratio: to see if it needs changing. And as for carb calculating, I have the Dario monitor, so I can just add up how many carbs and it automatically works out how much insulin.

    If grocery stores could just put all the low carb stuff in one isle, I would be happy.

  5. #5
    Senior Member BandsAiud's Avatar
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    Default Re: Adjusting to lifelong medications

    Quote Originally Posted by Havanana View Post
    When I was first diagnosed, I had a lot going on. High BP, a large Basal Cell Carcinoma that needed a graft, very obese. My heart rate was 120 just sitting in the doctor's office and my BP was 180/110. The only reason the doctor let me go home was because I wasn't showing any symptoms to support a trip to the ER. After the labs came back, I learned I had Type 2 diabetes.

    The surgery I needed required me to be fully anesthetized. I was told flat out, this was a no go. I would probably die on the table.

    That was my wake up call. I have seen what ignoring diabetes can do to friends and family.

    It took about a month to find sites where I can fit and tell my story and learn from others too and, frankly, I was extremely skeptical of the advice I can find online. Especially with all the "doom and gloom" I thought I knew about diabetes. I figured I had nothing to lose. With so much going on, I decided to try and work on my glucose since it seemed the easiest. I adopted a diet that would probably best be described as keto, got a FitBit, and committed to 10000 steps a day. It was tough mentally and physically. My glucose went down to normal within 6 months and I was lost 50 pounds. The success encouraged me to keep on going. The doctor was amazed. I was able to have that surgery. My BP became good. Really, just taking the steps to control diabetes seemed like hitting a reset button. Everything became better as my glucose levels dropped.

    Now, 5 years later, it is all habit. I eat the things I know are good for me. I got into cycling long distance. I was running for a while, but I HATE running. My doctor joked I just had to visit once a year like healthy people do. At first, it was every 3 or 4 months. I lost 100 pounds. I gained some back in muscle but my weight is stable now. At this point, I really don't think much about it because it is controlled. I visit this site becasue I have made friends here.

    While I don't present as a diabetic, I am clearly insulin resistant. If I ever doubt that, all I need is some cake or pie. I go up to about 140 and stay there for 3 or 4 hours then have a reactive hypoglycemia
    Just curious though, was there came a time when things got out of hand and you thought of getting a counselor at that time?

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    Administrator Islander's Avatar
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    Default Re: Adjusting to lifelong medications

    I think type two diabetes is much like alcoholism. If you are an alcoholic, you can be totally dry but you're still an alcoholic. I did pretty much what Havanana did, including the weight gain after I quit smoking, and like her I brought it all down without meds… Just diet and lifestyle changes. Everybody else here has heard my story so I'll just end by saying my A-1c is now down to 4.6. Like she says: willpower! Congratulations, Havanana!
    Last edited by Islander; 05-04-21 at 03:20 PM.
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

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    Default Re: Adjusting to lifelong medications

    Quote Originally Posted by Julieanne View Post
    Congratulations on all you have achieved! It sounds as though you are doing everything right, and that takes real willpower. Did you ever take any medication?
    I started on Metformin 1000mg a day but stopped taking, under doctor's advice, about 18 months after diagnosis. I am able to keep this under control with diet and exercise so far.

    At first, yes, it was willpower. While that is a powerful tool, I find it a negative motivation for long term changes. Willpower eventually became habit as I received positive reinforcement from losing weight, feeling better, becoming fit, and participating (or even considering) activities that I could not do when pre diabetes. The irony is that diabetes might have helped me live longer (who knows?) and, if not longer, certainly better. Now, it is pretty much auto-pilot as far as diet.

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