Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Herd Immunity

  1. #1
    Moderator Julieanne's Avatar
    Join Date
    18th April 2011
    Location
    Roleystone, Western Australia
    Posts
    6,135

    Default Herd Immunity

    Does anyone have articles on herd immunity that explain the difference between vaccination and contracting a disease?

  2. #2
    Veteran Member Katee's Avatar
    Join Date
    30th September 2007
    Location
    Big Bear, CA (tiny town in the mountains)
    Posts
    1,256

    Default Re: Herd Immunity

    There is this one, although I believe it to be propaganda. NIH doesn’t generally admit there is a difference between naturally acquired and vaccine derived immunity.

    https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2021/0...-an-infection/

    This is pro-vaccine, but it explains immunity well, transmission rates, and why some illnesses achieve or could achieve herd immunity and others won’t.

    https://intermountainhealthcare.org/...y-in-covid-19/


    This is an argument against vaccinations in general.

    http://www.doctoryourself.com/vaccination.html
    http://www.doctoryourself.com/vaccin_2.html


    Really good info on immunity in general, Covid specifically.
    https://www.westonaprice.org/health-...e-coronavirus/

    This is dated over a year ago. I didn’t listen to the podcast, but it has a list of high points below that is worth looking at.

    https://www.westonaprice.org/podcast...e-a-good-idea/

    Too many here to list separately.

    https://childrenshealthdefense.org/?s=Natural+immunity+

    Well, this one is important.

    https://childrenshealthdefense.org/d...ive-dangerous/

  3. #3
    Moderator Julieanne's Avatar
    Join Date
    18th April 2011
    Location
    Roleystone, Western Australia
    Posts
    6,135

    Default Re: Herd Immunity

    Thanks Katee! I have a doctor's visit next week and I just know he will bring up the topic of vaccinations. He is a really nice man and he does listen to me. Doesn't mean he'll change his view, but he will probably read anything I give him.

  4. #4
    Senior Member BandsAiud's Avatar
    Join Date
    21st November 2017
    Posts
    113

    Default Re: Herd Immunity

    Good articles, thanks!

  5. #5
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    19,614

    Default Re: Herd Immunity

    In my lifetime of reading, studying and researching the history of vaccines and their relation to disease, I have never met a more thorough article. Katee, congratulations to you on finding this precious gem!

    (I was referring to Andrew Saul's http://www.doctoryourself.com/vaccination.html, the first one of a pair).
    Last edited by Islander; 08-07-21 at 08:21 PM.
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

  6. #6
    Moderator Julieanne's Avatar
    Join Date
    18th April 2011
    Location
    Roleystone, Western Australia
    Posts
    6,135

    Default Re: Herd Immunity

    Islander, which one in particular? I can't overwhelm the poor man with too many articles or he won't read them.

    Sorry for the confusion, my fault. I was referring to Andrew Saul's http://www.doctoryourself.com/vaccination.html, the first one of a pair.

    There are two main types of immunity, the innate and the adaptive. I'm not sure whether this answers your question, but maybe it helps clarify how our immune system deals with pathogens.

    The Innate vs. Adaptive Immune Response

    The first line of defense against non-self pathogens is the innate, or non-specific, immune response. The innate immune response consists of physical, chemical and cellular defenses against pathogens. The main purpose of the innate immune response is to immediately prevent the spread and movement of foreign pathogens throughout the body.
    The second line of defense against non-self pathogens is called adaptive immune response. Adaptive immunity is also referred to as acquired immunity or specific immunity and is only found in vertebrates. The adaptive immune response is specific to the pathogen presented. The adaptive immune response is meant to attack non-self pathogens but can sometimes make errors and attack itself. When this happens, autoimmune diseases can develop (e.g., lupus, rheumatoid arthritis).

    Read more here: https://www.healio.com/hematology-oncology/learn-immuno-oncology/the-immune-system/the-innate-vs-adaptive-immune-response

    In other words, we are born with an innate immune system. The adaptive system develops later as it is exposed to a variety of pathogens. The more it experiences, the more effective it will be to counteract that attack. As I understand it, this applies to vaccination, in which the immune system is exposed to a very specific organism. At least, that's how it appears to me. Hope that helps.
    Last edited by Islander; 08-07-21 at 08:43 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. New Trump Covid-19 Adviser Pushes 'Herd Immunity' Strategy That Could Kill 2 Million
    By Islander in forum Coronavirus (temporary subforum)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-08-20, 06:18 AM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-17-19, 05:19 PM
  3. Will you stop lying about herd immunity?
    By Islander in forum Vaccines
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-26-19, 09:07 PM
  4. Herd Immunity: Myth or Reality?
    By Islander in forum Vaccines
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-08-14, 08:48 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-18-12, 12:49 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<<<<<<<< Your Customized Value <<<<<<<<