Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

  1. #1
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,138

    Default Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Monday, October 05, 2009 by: S. L. Baker

    (NaturalNews) When infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria, also known as superbugs, are in the mainstream news there's usually a sense of panic connected to the story. After all, this type of infection is spreading and can be life-threatening. For example, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a strain of staph that's become resistant to broad-spectrum antibiotics. MRSA can cause everything from swollen, painful boils to pneumonia, bloodstream infections and surgical wound infections that are lethal. And standard Western medicine has mostly run out of antibiotics to treat these potentially deadly health woes.

    However, a natural way to beat an enormous array of health-threatening germs has been around for thousands of years -- honey. And now scientists are zeroing in on just how a specific type known as manuka honey (http://www.naturalnews.com/023670_h...), made from the flowers of the New Zealand manuka bush, is able to stop superbugs in their tracks while standard antibiotic therapy is useless.

    Breakthrough research into the honey's remarkable disease-fighting abilities was announced this week (September 7 through 10) at the Society for General Microbiology's international meeting held at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland. Dr Rowena Jenkins and her investigative team from the University of Wales Institute-Cardiff in the United Kingdom presented results of their study showing that manuka honey appears to wipe out superbugs by destroying key bacterial proteins.

    "Manuka and other honeys have been known to have wound healing and anti-bacterial properties for some time," Dr Jenkins said in a statement to the media. "But the way in which they act is still not known. If we can discover exactly how manuka honey inhibits MRSA it could be used more frequently as a first-line treatment for infections with bacteria that are resistant to many currently available antibiotics."

    Dr. Jenkins and colleagues are closing in on that important discovery. For their latest research, MRSA was grown in their laboratory and treated with and without manuka honey for four hours. As a control, the experiment was repeated using a honey sugar syrup to document whether any anti-superbug effects seen were due to the sugar content in honey alone. Next, the cells of the bacteria were broken open so cell proteins could be isolated and separated on a system that documented and displayed each protein individually.

    The results showed manuka honey's anti-bacterial properties were not due to the sugars in the honey. When MRSA infected cells were treated with the entire manuka honey, instead of just the honey sugar syrup, they appeared to lose many proteins. One in particular, dubbed FabI, was totally missing.

    This is a critical finding because FabI is a protein necessary for the superbug's fatty acid biosynthesis, a process which supplies the bacteria with precursors they need to grow, thrive and continue infecting cells. So the scientists believe manuka honey is effective in killing MRSA because it wrecks the superbug's ability to keep proteins it needs to thrive.

    This latest research follows another manuka honey study published in Otolaryngology, the official journal of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, last July. Scientists from the University of Ottawa's Department of Otolaryngology tested both manuka honey and sidr honey, which comes from the sidr tree in Yemen and has been used for its infection-stopping ability for countless centuries, on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) -- including the MRSA type.

    The researchers worked with the infections growing in biofilms -- thin, slimy layers formed by bacteria that are especially resistant to antibiotics. But the PA and SA bacteria were no match for the manuka and sidr honey. In their conclusion, the scientists wrote: "Honey, which is a natural, nontoxic, and inexpensive product, is effective in killing SA and PA bacterial biofilms. This intriguing observation may have important clinical implications and could lead to a new approach for treating refractory CRS chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)."

    For more information:

    http://www.sgm.ac.uk/
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/3...
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/...
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mr...
    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/ar_M...

    http://tinyurl.com/yb85m2v

  2. #2
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2008
    Posts
    4,263

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Not all Manuka honeys are equal. you must use a honey with a high UMF (Unique Manuka honey Factor) if you want these therapeutic properties. The higher the UMF, the more expensive the honey.

  3. #3
    EmmaPeel
    Guest

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaltrude
    Not all Manuka honeys are equal. you must use a honey with a high UMF (Unique Manuka honey Factor) if you want these therapeutic properties. The higher the UMF, the more expensive the honey.
    I bought Wedderspoon with "Active 16+"...and you are correct, O Wise One:p, $40 smackeroons for 500g!! It must be obviously cheaper where you are! I've decided to save it for sore throats and coughs with a little lemon...if I let #1 son at it, it'll be gone by morning light....lol

    How do you find out the UMF???

  4. #4
    Veteran Member DizzyIzzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    29th October 2008
    Location
    Aotearoa - Land of erm... sheep and clouds and grumpy volcanoes
    Posts
    931

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Ha, you'd think it'd be cheaper here but it's just as pricey as everywhere else in the world... before it got all *trendy* and *powerful* and *cool* I remember when it was like $10/kilo, but there's no way you'd find that now, ha.

    The UMF is on the label - not sure how they test it exactly; think it's the measure of the percentage of active antibacterial factors in it.

    I buy normal un-UMF-tested stuff to eat when I want to eat it, or for toast or drinks or whatever, and I have another (much smaller) jar of UMF 20 stuff that's just for when I'm sick or have a cut or burn or whatever.

  5. #5
    EmmaPeel
    Guest

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Quote Originally Posted by DizzyIzzy
    Ha, you'd think it'd be cheaper here but it's just as pricey as everywhere else in the world... before it got all *trendy* and *powerful* and *cool* I remember when it was like $10/kilo, but there's no way you'd find that now, ha.

    The UMF is on the label - not sure how they test it exactly; think it's the measure of the percentage of active antibacterial factors in it.

    I buy normal un-UMF-tested stuff to eat when I want to eat it, or for toast or drinks or whatever, and I have another (much smaller) jar of UMF 20 stuff that's just for when I'm sick or have a cut or burn or whatever.
    Whoa...$10/kg that's cheap...! I remember going to a apiary in southern British Columbia a few years ago where the honey was unpasteurized and the bee's protected...back then a kilo cost about $37/kg and I brought home a year's supply, along with some candles( very expensive at $15 for 2-4" votives!...I make my own now...) Found a little cottage industry in the middle of a glen out in the middle of no-where where this little lady sold me 2 kg for $50. Too bad I have to spend the plane fare and drive about 6 hours to get it....!! She doesn't ship.

    Not the same as Manuka, but has many good things too...

    So, I wonder if the 16+ on the label means the UMF ? Is that good? What are the ratings and what do they mean?

  6. #6
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2008
    Posts
    4,263

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Quote Originally Posted by DizzyIzzy
    Ha, you'd think it'd be cheaper here but it's just as pricey as everywhere else in the world... before it got all *trendy* and *powerful* and *cool* I remember when it was like $10/kilo, but there's no way you'd find that now, ha.

    The UMF is on the label - not sure how they test it exactly; think it's the measure of the percentage of active antibacterial factors in it.
    Manuka honey is tested for its UMF by testing how much it inhibits the growth of a certain bacteria in comparison with various dilutions of phenol. There is some info on this website.
    http://manukahoney.com/resources/umf.html

    Iz, I know where you can get some Manuka honey that is untested but probably 20+ for NZ$10/kilo. It has certainly worked everytime I have used it therapeutically. The hives are right alongside some that have been tested at 20+. If you are ever in my area on a Sunday, contact me and I'll let you know where you can get it.
    Last edited by Aaltrude; 10-06-09 at 02:31 PM.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2008
    Posts
    4,263

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaPeel
    So, I wonder if the 16+ on the label means the UMF ? Is that good? What are the ratings and what do they mean?
    16+ probably does refer to the UMF rating but it should say UMF. Testing for UMF is only performed in one laboratory in NZ and the producers are paying for the privilige of being able to state the UMF factor of their honey. The UMF trademark is owned by the Active Manuka Honey Association (AMHA), a group of New Zealand manuka honey producers which licences members to use the trademark to market their products, provided products are tested and have a minimum level of UMF 10. Only New Zealand honey will carry a UMF rating and the producers are not going to omit those three important letters.
    Last edited by Aaltrude; 10-06-09 at 03:00 PM.

  8. #8
    EmmaPeel
    Guest

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Thanks for the information on UMF Aaltrude! Geez, can I come over on Sunday too if I am in the area????...let's see...it's Tuesday here...so if I leave now....I just might get there by Sunday!!! LOL

    The wound dressings I use at work are very expensive and cost per unit is about $20+...that's every time you change the dressing which is usually every 2-3 days according to the instructions.

    I think it would just be so much cheaper if they bought bulk and permitted us to use basic dressings that we already have! But there you have it. The facility budget is being gouged by the pharmaceutical provider...what else is new??

    I have seen some amazing wound healing with manuka honey...

  9. #9
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2008
    Posts
    4,263

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaPeel
    Thanks for the information on UMF Aaltrude! Geez, can I come over on Sunday too if I am in the area????...let's see...it's Tuesday here...so if I leave now....I just might get there by Sunday!!! LOL
    The UMF of honey can vary from year to year, even from the same hives. We are stock piling some of this honey from this years batch just in case it is not as good next year.

  10. #10
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2008
    Posts
    4,263

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    It looks like UMF testing is now old technology. I just discovered this information.
    http://www.mgomanuka.com/methylglyoxal.cfm

    The leaves of the Manuka tree can be infused in hot water to make a very nice and refreshing tea.

  11. #11
    Veteran Member DizzyIzzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    29th October 2008
    Location
    Aotearoa - Land of erm... sheep and clouds and grumpy volcanoes
    Posts
    931

    Default Re: Scientists Document How Manuka Honey Fights Superbugs

    Yeah, it's worth noting that the NZ manuka tree - which is a kind of tea tree - can be substituted for the Australian Tea Tree, but is much stronger and more potent than the Aussie version, but a lot gentler on the body and skin (i.e. when using the oil)!! Fancy that?

    (Promise I'm not just instigating NZ/Aus rivalry here guys!)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. New Method Used To Detect Antibiotics In Honey
    By Islander in forum Organic Farming & Gardening
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-12-09, 09:24 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-25-09, 08:30 PM
  3. China Honey Latest Food Safety Worry
    By Islander in forum Unsafe Ingredients , Food Additives, Toxins
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-05-09, 09:39 AM
  4. Honey for coughs in young children
    By mellowsong in forum Early Childhood
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-04-07, 11:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<<<<<<<< Your Customized Value <<<<<<<<