Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 34

Thread: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

  1. #16
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,975

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morning
    ISLANDER -- please, if someone is that thin skinned, they have more problems than my commentary. Nonsense needs to be called nonsense. Period. I'm sick of people who want to tap dance around the subject and humor some of these fools. Let's all just be oh-so-nice and just get along...sorry, that's not me.
    Michael, you are holding up for review two extremes: dismiss and disparage vs. tiptoe around nicely. May I suggest that there is a middle ground. It is possible to rebut a source by pointing out the error or fallacy and, if possible, giving a source for your own information. Instead of appearing to shout down a differing point of view, you are now educating the reader while reinforcing your own credibility.

    Any mental health professional will tell you that change is cyclic, not linear. You have seen hundreds of posters on mercola.com say that they did x, y and z, then slid back on y, but are now on track again and are even ready to try a and b. Slapping them around will not hasten the process of bringing them to your point of view. Persuasion is a gradual process of lather, rinse, repeat. Done with grace, it can result in positive change over time.

    You yourself have said that nutrition is not an exact science. It should be apparent that there will be differences of opinion on diet and lifestyle topics. That may not mean that one is wrong and the other right. Further, ask yourself why I should accept your position over, say, that of Barron or Wright or Mercola or Adams or Rowen or Richards or any other natural health “authority.” As Robert B. Parker says, “I know who you are — but I don’t pray to you.” If change is made to look appealing by the bringer of information, readers are more likely to embrace it...given time.

  2. #17
    EmmaPeel
    Guest

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    And, in addendum...it does seem that health information especially on the internet, has to be specifically tactful, patient, and inoffensive since there is no face to face contact which we as human beings, require for the understanding of the nuances of what is being communicated.

    Miscommunication and often misinterpretation are always a challenge to avoid...

  3. #18
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,975

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaPeel
    And, in addendum...it does seem that health information especially on the internet, has to be specifically tactful, patient, and inoffensive since there is no face to face contact which we as human beings, require for the understanding of the nuances of what is being communicated.

    Miscommunication and often misinterpretation are always a challenge to avoid...
    Yup. Even more so since the health information we are promoting is so often written off as quackery.

  4. #19
    EmmaPeel
    Guest

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Quote Originally Posted by Islander
    Yup. Even more so since the health information we are promoting is so often written off as quackery.
    I encounter so many people too, each day, who have just no idea about the things we promote here. Some of them members of my own family as you know. Often times my encounters are brief due to time constraints, but I found that gentle bites of information work for some, and they usually go off and do their own research and come back astounded at what they found. Then they ask for more resources....and so on.

    Doesn't work all the time. You can't drag anything to water and force it to drink by beating it over the head or using fear mongering...I have had someone do that to me recently in my own life, and all it did was make me lose respect for that person and want to run in the opposite direction...!

  5. #20
    New Member Michael Morning's Avatar
    Join Date
    23rd August 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    I think this has gone way off track. I point out that an article is "nonsense" (I said nothing more than that and even presented a reference as evidence of my position). I see nothing wrong with this and am astonished that ISLANDER would suggest this was tantamount to name calling.

    That has transmogrified into dealing with other people in spreading nutritional awareness. I am extremely experienced in dealing with clients, highly sympathetic and not above hand holding. But dealing with clients, your family or associates and shouting down a b.s. article are two entirely different things. I just wanted to make that clear since the discussion completely jumped the track.

    OBVIOUSLY you have to be easy about how you bring new people into the fold. But shouting down nonsensical articles NEEDS to be done. Two entirely different things!
    -Michael Morning
    www.MichaelMorning.com

  6. #21
    Veteran Member mellowsong's Avatar
    Join Date
    24th September 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,570

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Michael, I tend to agree with you on what you've written here. As this article states, even a tiny amount of variation in the "normal" pH range of the blood leads to extreme illness and if not rapidly corrected, death. The LIVING body is always alkaline. If blood pH goes below 7.35 death will ensue. Anything over 7.0 is alkaline.

    I also don't believe there is any one diet that is suitable for every person. Most of the time I am in agreement with Jon Barron I don't agree with what he says here. However, I notice he contradicts himself a little at the end by saying give up PASTEURIZED dairy whereas earlier in the article he says dairy, period.

    Personally, I have tried vegetarian and vegan for humanitarian as well as physical reasons and I get extremely ill very fast without ANIMAL protein in my diet. I do not know why this is; I do know that I have given it at least 3 tries over the last few years.

  7. #22
    New Member Michael Morning's Avatar
    Join Date
    23rd August 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Personally, I have tried vegetarian and vegan for humanitarian as well as physical reasons and I get extremely ill very fast without ANIMAL protein in my diet. I do not know why this is; I do know that I have given it at least 3 tries over the last few years.
    Without jumping to conclusions, the likelihood here is that it's animal FAT that you can't do without. There is so much research showing that animal fat - particularly saturated fat - has numerous health benefits and degenerative disorders come of not getting enough. A comprehensive (albeit long) article on the subject is here: http://www.health-report.co.uk/satur...h_benefits.htm
    -Michael Morning
    www.MichaelMorning.com

  8. #23
    Veteran Member DizzyIzzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    29th October 2008
    Location
    Aotearoa - Land of erm... sheep and clouds and grumpy volcanoes
    Posts
    931

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Wow, big discussion!

    Sometimes, I really do think you've gotta be blunt. Putting it bluntly. Change is definitely cyclical - I think we've all probably experienced that first-hand - but sometimes you gotta call a spade a spade and be a bit blunt to get through. That's not talking about explaining things to clients or dealing with them where they are; obviously tact is required and if you approach somebody from their level, not yours, you're gonna be far better results. Taking people by the hand instead of yelling at them.

    Anyway.

    Yes, I'm with Michael and Mellowsong here.... but not to repeat...

    What am I talking about? I don't know.


    I'm trying raw food at the moment. Not entirely; I need animal fat or I can't function. But primarily raw. Let's see how it goes.

    I don't think there is a 'perfect' diet for anybody, but I do tend to think the WAPF and a raw food-type philosophy (but not exclusively so) are the way forward.

    Scientifically, the acid/alkali thing is a load of crap in terms of alkalising/acidifying, as mellowsong said. But there does seem to be something to the philosophy, i.e. it works... the difference in the blood ain't gonna be much though.

  9. #24
    EmmaPeel
    Guest

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Were we talking about diet debunking or about the skill of educating people...or both??

    Disagree with you on this one Diz...I think...oh hell...LOL
    When I discuss things with my patients, I find that tact, small doses, and careful determination of their ability and readiness to accept what is laid out before them is crucial.

    Same goes for internet communications even more so...where one must be even MORE tactful and careful in presenting things for the pure and simple reason that no one will never know how the audience will accept it or just how ready they are to process what is laid out before them...

    Now some might say, " this is the internet, if you can't handle it get a radio"....which I find irresponsible. Yes, open communication is good, but always be mindful of the audience, n'est pas, lest you drive them away running for the hills...

  10. #25
    Veteran Member DizzyIzzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    29th October 2008
    Location
    Aotearoa - Land of erm... sheep and clouds and grumpy volcanoes
    Posts
    931

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Exactly!

    Don't think I explained myself very well. It's like, 5.30am and I've been watching a live webcast of an intense autism science meeting from the US, so distracted and sleep-deprived... forgive me.

    I think sometimes though - not always, sometimes - you really do just need to be blunt. Not often, and it depends on situaton and audience and subject and whatever else. But I can see where Michael was coming from and agree; sometimes you just gotta call BS on things. Can't pussy-foot around things all the time.

    When dealing with clients though, always... gotta be at their level or you ain't got a hope. Likewise the general public. Education is a skill.

  11. #26
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2008
    Posts
    4,262

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morning
    There is so much research showing that animal fat - particularly saturated fat - has numerous health benefits and degenerative disorders come of not getting enough.
    OK Michael, do you have any suggestions how I can increase the fat and healthy oils in my diet. I have MCS and I am intolerant of many foods. (MCS among other issues, causes liver and digestive problems). These intolerances include meat which if I eat it, goes straight through me in a very unpleasant manner. I am intolerant of all dairy products. They cause the same reaction as meat plus heart palpatations (PVC's). I also react to the most minute amount of oil, such as olive oil, in food. I cannot eat flax seed oil but I can and do eat flax seed. I do use flax seed oil on my skin like a moisturiser. I can also eat avocados and eggs and make a point of including these in my diet.
    I am also intolerant of most supplements.

  12. #27
    Veteran Member mellowsong's Avatar
    Join Date
    24th September 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,570

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morning
    Without jumping to conclusions, the likelihood here is that it's animal FAT that you can't do without. There is so much research showing that animal fat - particularly saturated fat - has numerous health benefits and degenerative disorders come of not getting enough. A comprehensive (albeit long) article on the subject is here: http://www.health-report.co.uk/satur...h_benefits.htm
    That's a possibility I hadn't considered although I do fine with coconut oil. My thinking is that I cannot get enough protein (I seem to need a high protein diet) without overdoing the carbs. I do know that I do much much better on a very low carb diet.

  13. #28
    New Member Michael Morning's Avatar
    Join Date
    23rd August 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    OK Michael, do you have any suggestions how I can increase the fat and healthy oils in my diet. I have MCS and I am intolerant of many foods.
    Hi, Aaltrude

    It sounds to me like your MCS has increased to the sensitization stage. In essence, your body becomes sensitized to a wide range of things that it shouldn't be reacting to. Sensitization in this instance means that you begin reacting to things you don't actually have an allergy to....like a nerve that's been activated and keeps firing off even when there's nothing irritating it.

    The fact that you note reacting to meat, in a general sense, as opposed to a particular kind of meat, is almost proof positive of this. This suggests that you aren't "allergic" to meat, but potentially to one kind, or merely just a related food, that has sensitized you to anything even bearing a resemblance. Oils sound like another similar issue. Perhaps they're related, perhaps not.

    While there's no easy answer to sensitization, it can become absolutely debilitating if allowed to continue (as I think ISLANDER has noted in the past, there's hardly anything you can eat anymore). What's more, it may (and likely will) only get worse over time.

    That being the case, what you need to do is focus on desensitization. I am not in any way experienced in this other than simply being aware of it. With that in mind, rather than focus on what few foods you can eat (because new foods may only bring in new reactions), I would start researching - if you haven't already gone down this road - naturopaths or other specialists experienced with MCS, especially your brand of it (that is, with the extensive food allergies; something only about half of MCS patients suffer from). Rather than live with it and constantly trying to work around it, you really need to nip it in the bud if at all humanly possible.

    Sorry I don't have a better answer for you :(

    P.S. As you may already be aware, MCS is normally not related to food, but to environmental toxins causing an immune reaction as the underlying cause of "allergies" (that is, allergies that aren't allergies but rather manifest LIKE an allergy), sort of like a cascade effect. I can only assume you've ruled out any such thing. In a few rare instances, I've heard of extreme EMF-phobes developing problems very similar to MCS.
    Last edited by Michael Morning; 09-09-10 at 06:46 AM.
    -Michael Morning
    www.MichaelMorning.com

  14. #29
    Veteran Member DizzyIzzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    29th October 2008
    Location
    Aotearoa - Land of erm... sheep and clouds and grumpy volcanoes
    Posts
    931

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Hey Aaltrude, that just reminded me... have you looked into NAET at all, just as a thought?

  15. #30
    Veteran Member Katee's Avatar
    Join Date
    30th September 2007
    Location
    Big Bear, CA (tiny town in the mountains)
    Posts
    1,247

    Default Re: Limits of Adaptability in the Human Body

    Well, the original discussion (i think) was about food for blood types.

    What do you think about food combining?

    The theory is that foods take different PH balances to digest well. So you eat some foods by themselves, & others in combinations that will help you digest them better. Some things are never to be eaten with other things.

    I think i have the info on it, tho i've not followed their food plan (although i think i did get a recipe for a wonderful spaghetti sauce from the site). But three of my aunties (i have 7) have been following this plan. One was on meds constantly (like Prilosec or something) & she doesn't need meds any more. Also, they have all lost weight & feel healthier. I encouraged my mother to try it (she's on several different meds, i think, & Prilosec is one) but i think she thinks it is easier to take a pill.

    Of course, it could be that they are now simply eating healthier on this diet, but the ones doing it have been pleased with the results.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. The Marvels of Brown Seaweeds on the Human Body
    By katybr in forum Healthy Diet & Lifestyle Suggestions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-16-08, 06:31 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<<<<<<<< Your Customized Value <<<<<<<<