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Thread: ADHD

  1. #1
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    Default ADHD

    By Jon Barron on 09/11/2010

    Could your child’s birthday be to blame for his ADHD diagnosis? Maybe, especially if he’s one of the youngest students in the class.
    In soon-to-be published research in the Journal of Health Economics, health economist Todd Elder, PhD, of Michigan State University, East Lansing, says as many as 1 million children in the U.S. may have been misdiagnosed with ADHD, simply because of their age and maturity level.

    That ought to be terrifying news, when you consider that the "cure" for ADHD is one of the most commonly overprescribed drugs in America — Methylphenidate, the generic name for a group of drugs that includes Ritalin, Concerta, Metadate CD and others. About 29 million prescriptions were written last year in the United States for Ritalin and similar drugs to treat attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity, 23 million of them for children.
    While kids around the country are popping them like candy, few parents know the very real risks associated with these psychotropic medications such as:
    • A 2005 study showed that Ritalin and other stimulant drugs given to children might increase their risk of cancer later in life.
    • In a 70-week study, preschoolers on Ritalin, grew about half an inch less and gained about 2 pounds less than expected.
    • A University of Buffalo study proved that Ritalin has the potential for causing long-lasting changes in brain cell structure and function.
    • Hostility, aggression, anxiety, depression, and paranoia and suicide are potential side effects of Ritalin.
    Matthew Smith’s parents wish they had known more about Ritalin before agreeing to give it to their son. Fourteen year old Matthew suddenly died on March 21, 2000. The cause of death was determined to be from the long-term (age 7-14) use of Ritalin. According to the Chief Pathologist of Oakland County, Michigan, upon autopsy, Matthew’s heart showed clear signs of small vessel damage caused from the use of Methylphenidate (Ritalin). In fact, according to his father, the certificate of death reads: "Death caused from Long Term Use of Methylphenidate, Ritalin."
    And the reason Matthew was originally placed on Ritalin? In first grade, Matthew was an active child who wasn’t as mature as some of his peers. That immaturity cost him his life.
    Elder’s study found that the youngest children in kindergarten were 60% more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than their oldest classmates and were more likely to be on ADHD medications than the older kids. In gambling circles, those would be known as bankable odds. One in 100 preschoolers is already on Ritalin. That works out to 70,000+ children between the ages of 3 and 4 on a daily dose of psychotropic drugs. I’ll leave it to science fiction writers to imagine what the long term consequences might be.

    What are we doing to our children?
    We punish our kids for being active, playful, and sociable — all of the things we should want our kids to be. Maybe the problem isn’t our kids. Maybe the problem is that too many schools are demanding that we drug our kids into uniform, passive submission.
    All I can say is, "Thank goodness Ritalin wasn’t in use during the 30’s, or we’d never have the Little Rascals to enjoy today. Every single one of them would have been considered ADHD and drugged into boring conformity."

    http://www.healthiertalk.com/immatur...aken-adhd-2399

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    Default Re: Immaturity Mistaken for ADHD

    I've posted this article because I've seen the topic treated in several different places, and I disagree with the thesis.

    First, let me say that I do think some children are diagnosed irresponsibly, without careful evaluation. I've done the Conners Scale on many kids, and it's a fairly fine-tuned tool that, while by itself cannot rule anyone in or out, can give a lot of insight into a child's behavior. Other tools, as well as a doctor's careful observation, are required to make a definite diagnosis, and I suspect that doesn't happen often enough.

    I can also say that from my own observation, not every ADHD kid needs to be medicated, but many benefit immensely from the right drug. I've also seen what happens when the authentic drug is replaced with a generic equivalent. Generics are allowed to vary by 10% from the original, and in some cases that variation is enough to make the substitution worthless.

    But my argument is with the premise that young, immature kids are mistakenly diagnosed. I'm here to say that any child over the age of two can be taught to meet behavioral expectations. And that's a fact.
    Last edited by Islander; 09-11-10 at 09:43 PM.

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    Veteran Member DizzyIzzy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Immaturity Mistaken for ADHD

    They can, but I have to say I do agree with what he's saying, in that some kids who are more immature are misdiagnosed; it's something to bear in mind, particularly where teachers are the ones pushing for the diagnosis (as they so often are). And kids can be taught, but they've gotta have somebody to teach them, and sadly many miss out. One behavioural specialist I know sees this all the time with the kids referred to her for behavioural problems - reasonably often it's the parents/teachers with the problem, and the kids just mirror their behaviour or are allowed to run riot and suddenly they've got 'ADHD' or whatever waved about, when the reality is a good diet and some decent parenting and teaching at home and at school would make the world of difference.

    Not always, and I'm not saying bad parenting causes ADHD...

    But sometimes there is a role there. Just like sometimes the kids might be immature, sometimes they might just be creative and excitable, sometimes they just want attention.... and sometimes they have ADHD.

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    Veteran Member mellowsong's Avatar
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    Default Re: Immaturity Mistaken for ADHD

    Quote Originally Posted by Islander
    I've posted this article because I've seen the topic treated in several different places, and I disagree with the thesis.

    But my argument is with the premise that young, immature kids are mistakenly diagnosed. I'm here to say that any child over the age of two can be taught to meet behavioral expectations. And that's a fact.
    I pretty much agree with what you are saying. I just want to throw something out there. This is personal because it's my grandson, but I've belonged to multiple nutrition groups where a lot of the emphasis was on kids with autism or behavioral issues and the results with the use of nutrition have been dramatic to say the least.

    Joey is my 4 1/2 y/o grandson. He is very smart, no doubt about it. If I was a non-biased observer I would say he had ADHD and worse. However, 99% of his behavioral issues are tied to food. When he goes off the wall, we now know to look at everything. Corn and MSG are the primary triggers. He started school a few weeks ago and things were so bad, my daughter was afraid they were going to kick him out.

    He was wetting his pants 2 or 3 times a day. Wouldn't listen, wouldn't cooperate etc etc. Constant notes and phone calls from the teacher. I told Val to look at his diet really close. She discovered some gluten free cookies she'd been buying were now using corn flour instead of whatever they'd been using. A few days off of those, and he quit wetting his pants, but behavior was still awful. He couldn't be quiet, sit still, was disruptive, then...he tore down the molding on the wall.

    I went to my daughter's house (at her request) and looked at the labels on EVERYTHING she was feeding him. She had bought some gluten free, nitrate free hot dogs. Well, the label had at least 3 terms that were disguises for MSG....no more hot dogs.

    This week, his behavior has gotten progressively better. So something very few parents, teachers OR doctors look at is the impact food can have on a child.

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    Default Re: Immaturity Mistaken for ADHD

    Patty, I agree 100% because, as I have reported elsewhere, we had a foster son in the same situation. As long as his diet was additive- and sugar-free, he was fine. He went off the hook twice: once when he got into his sister's Halloween candy, and again when he raided her delivery of girl Scout cookies.

    But not all cases of apparent ADHD are nutrition-related, unfortunately.

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    Veteran Member DizzyIzzy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Immaturity Mistaken for ADHD

    You guys should check out the MINDD foundation, they're amazing... their basic idea is that the majority of disorders like autism, ADD/ADHD, allergies, behavioural, digestive, immune, etc things share the same common pathway... and they certainly get results primarily via nutrition and healing those common starting points. Hopefully if I get some grant money from somewhere I'll be doing a lot of their training. www.mindd.org

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    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Immaturity Mistaken for ADHD

    I feel I would probably have been incorrectly diagnosed as ADHD as a child had it been a recognised disorder then as a result of the hearing problem I have. I was a very active kid, very much a tomboy, and in class if I was not hearing correctly, I was very innattentive.

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    Default Re: Immaturity Mistaken for ADHD

    Today your hearing problem would be labeled as a learning disability. LD kids get their needs met to insure their success. Unity College, where I taught, had one of the few college-level LD specialists and learning center where kids went for support. Most of the LD kids I had in classes had dyslexia-type problems but there was an assortment of rarer disorders, and one of them was a young lady with a hearing issue like yours.

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    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Immaturity Mistaken for ADHD

    Quote Originally Posted by Islander
    Today your hearing problem would be labeled as a learning disability. LD kids get their needs met to insure their success. Unity College, where I taught, had one of the few college-level LD specialists and learning center where kids went for support. Most of the LD kids I had in classes had dyslexia-type problems but there was an assortment of rarer disorders, and one of them was a young lady with a hearing issue like yours.
    That sounds fairly positive. Are teachers taught to recognise the symptoms of this type of disorder. In my case, I would do very well one day and poorly the next (because my ears were not enterpreting what the teacher was saying).

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    Default Re: Immaturity Mistaken for ADHD

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaltrude
    Are teachers taught to recognise the symptoms of this type of disorder?
    It would seem so, although Unity had a self-selected population to a degree. That is, since we were one of the few schools that could offer that kind of personal attention and support, we attracted a larger percentage of LD students, I think. I could expect anywhere from 2-4 in any class of 15-18 kids. These are kids who were identified in high school or earlier. And Unity faculty were trained in how best to assist them in and out of class, e.g. a dyslexic student might have a test or final exam read to him, and could either write or dictate the responses. One kid, who had a fine muscle control issue, was allowed to use a laptop for all written work (back in the day when laptops were VERY uncommon). Among the faculty there were at that time 2 who did not "believe in" learning disdabilities; in the English department, our specialist tried to funnel them all to me.

  11. #11
    kateelclark
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    Default ADHD

    Good day to you all

    Attention deficit disorder / Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder signs and symptoms in young children are at all times being researched and studied to create suitable therapy and treatment.

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder is a very wide topic, not only related to children. There's the medical and the holistic side of ADD. To learn and get more information regarding ADD or ADHD, including ODD presented in children. Also if you're interested in proper child behavior, refer to <a href="http://blogtext.org/abbieapclark/article/453012.html ">Oppositional Defiant Disorder</a> and for a wider information regarding ADD symptoms, have a look in <a href="http://katevjclark.wordpress.com/2011/03/29/must-i-be-concerned-about-add-adhd-signs-and-symptoms-in-children/ ">ADD Symptoms</a> blog.

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    Veteran Member Reesacat's Avatar
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    Default Re: ADHD

    Kateelclark, you links did not come through. Can you edit your post?
    Also, we have a new member section where you can introduce yourself to the forum.
    Are you interested in ADHD/ADD? Are you trying to educate people on what to do about it?

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