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Thread: Managing osteoporosis

  1. #1
    Veteran Member Katee's Avatar
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    Default Managing osteoporosis

    I received this in a newsletter. I have strong feelings about this, but was told i "read it wrong." Opinions, please.

    Undo Osteoporosis And Develop Stronger Bones By Making Just One Change In Your Diet.

    That’s right! Make just one change in your eating habits this month, and you could stop osteoporosis in its tracks, and possibly even reverse it! The actual research on osteoporosis runs contrary to everything you’re being told on TV commercials. Dairy products and other animal proteins do not necessarily build strong hones. In fact, they can possibly make your bones weaker.

    Many recent studies reinforce this point that is brought up. Research is showing that it may not be milk and cheese that create strong bones and prevent osteoporosis. Some recent studies are showing that it may be a low fat and low cholesterol plant based diet. In an investigation of worldwide trends by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, scientists found that increased consumption of vegetable protein may actually help prevent hip fractures in those that are susceptible.

    In over thirty countries around the world, the researchers compared diet and hip fracture incidents. They found a direct relationship between hip fractures and protein intake. In regions where vegetable protein intake was the highest, the incidence of hip fractures was in contrast the lowest. On the other hand, the countries that had the highest intake of animal protein also had the highest incidence of hip fracture rates.

    These research findings showed a direct correlation. Of course, further research is necessary.

    A quantity of extra research also shows that animal protein may be bad for your bones. This includes dairy goods that comprise animal protein. The majority of people think they need to consume dairy products to construct and preserve physically powerful bones. But a lot of studies are now showing that avoiding animal protein just may be the real thing that they need. What’s more is that the very foods that nearly everyone considers the best for osteoporosis protection such as milk, cheese, and yogurt are occupied of the fats and proteins that are actually doing the harm. This is of course opposing to what’s regularly advertised in the media.

    The animal-protein link has been known for some time. Unfortunately, you don’t hear too much about it in the news. Years of relentless campaigning by the dairy industry has overshadowed these facts, and made generations of Americans believe that calcium is the key to preventing osteoporosis and that dairy products are the best source of calcium.

    High-quality proteins come from vegetables and whole grains. As an alternative to loading up on high or even low fat animal proteins, try some of the many delicious sources of vegetable protein. The majority people don’t realize that legumes and nuts hold up to 20 grams of protein per cup. Whole grains like oatmeal contain about 6 grams per cup, and vegetables like broccoli and brussel sprouts comprise around 6 grams per cup. They are filled with it.

    You should eat animal proteins sparingly. You should make sure that the main part of your diet consists of fruits, grains, and vegetables. If you are someone who is trying to wean yourself from dairy foods and miss the taste, try some of the soy-based non-dairy milks and cheeses or even almond or rice milk. But it is important to watch out for the fat content in those products. Many of them are still loaded with it and more. Don’t forget to use soy products in moderation. Isolated soy proteins found in many vegetarian burgers, hot dogs, lunch meats, and wheat gluten are also concentrated proteins. They can leach calcium from your bones.

    Written by: Dirk Kanc http://www.populararticles.com/article202254.html
    Last edited by Islander; 06-27-11 at 09:35 PM.

  2. #2
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your opinion please

    This ties in with a lot of the information I have read. Osteoporosis is almost non existant in societies that do not consume dairy products.
    My mother was a dairy farmer's daughter and was brought up consuming a lot of dairy which she continued to do throughout her life. She developed osteoporosis at a relatively young age.

    Two books you would find interesting to read are "The Osteoporosis Epidemic " by Gill Sanson and "The Calcium Lie" by Robert Thospson M.D. and Kathleen Barnes.

  3. #3
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    I concur with what Aaltrude said (I was busy editing the title so she got her reply in two minutes ahead of mine!) The evidence for dairy being protection against osteoporosis seems to be propaganda generated by the dairy industry, with no solid evidence to support it. In fact most mammals, including the majority of humans, are weaned once they have a full set of teeth.

    I'm also tired of the meat vs. vegetarian dispute, having waded through over 400 posts on this topic recently. A few vegetarians, who manage their diet very carefully, can remain healthy, but we humans evolved on an omniverous diet and most of us thrive on meat to one degree or another. Yes, there is protein in plants, but unless you are wise in combining complementary sources of amino acids, you are not getting a complete protein. Nor are you getting the value of essential animal fats, which our bodies cannot produce.

    Here's what comes to mind as sources of bone strength (others please help me out here):
    • Vitamin D
    • magnesium
    • potassium
    • calcium (in moderation — you can fill your needs with green vegetables)
    • another mineral...is it strontium?
    • weight-bearing exercise, such as walking

    I am skeptical of anything that comes in newsletters, in forwards, or as some bit of wisdom you have to pay for. Good health information is free, and there are no "secrets."

    Final thought: CORRELATION DOES NOT EQUAL CAUSATION!

    P.S. I just re-read your letter and the phrase "low-fat" should have set off alarms! Same with cholesterol. Dietary cholesterol has no relation to serum cholesterol. That should be well known, but it's not.
    Last edited by Islander; 09-23-10 at 11:22 PM.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    The minerals required for healthy bones, from "The Calcium Lie":

    in no particular order
    Calcium
    Potassium
    Magnesium
    Manganese
    Silica
    Iron
    Zinc
    Selenium
    Boron
    Phosphorus
    Sulfur
    Chromium
    and many other trace minerals


    ...and yes Islander also Strontium

  5. #5
    Veteran Member DizzyIzzy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    As far as I'm aware, the best thing you can do to prevent osteoporosis is get a loooot of weight-bearing exercise in while you're a teenager/young adult (and to a lesser extent in childhood). Above all else. It builds the bones while they're growing so they get good n' strong and you don't end up suffering decades later. Obviously a good diet is needed with loads of minerals so you're getting the materials there to make the bone with, but leaving it till decades later when the bones are already in poor shape isn't going to do much, no matter what you eat.

  6. #6
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    I have read reports of people who have been able to increase their bone mass later in life. It would appear this is not necessarily correct.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member DizzyIzzy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    How'd they do it? I'm sure it's possible (health-wise, anything is as far as I'm concerned). Just not necessarily easy for the not-so-committed.

  8. #8
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    As Aaltrude says, osteoporosis can be arrested and even reversed with nutrition and lifestyle changes. They once thought the brain stopped producing new neurons past a certain age.

  9. #9
    Veteran Member Katee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    Thank you for your input. I have issues with this article. It arrived in an email newsletter. I often let these sit for a while, but Wednesday i had time and opened it. I skimmed the article and this stood out glaringly:

    . . . recent studies are showing that it may be a low fat and low cholesterol plant based diet. . . The animal-protein link has been known for some time. . . High-quality proteins come from vegetables and whole grains.

    Then i read this:

    . . . If you are someone who is trying to wean yourself from dairy foods and miss the taste, try some of the soy-based non-dairy milks and cheeses . . . it is important to watch out for the fat content in those products. Many of them are still loaded with it and more.

    After much study on the issue, i have come to believe that the "low fat, low cholesterol" diet is a huge mistake. I believe the current food pyramid recommendations of eating a large portion of our calories as grains and very little fat is much of what is driving the ill health of our country including diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. I also believe that soy is NOT a health food and should never be consumed by humans unless it is fermented. So i was much concerned about these recommendations.

    This newsletter came from my office. I have much regard for the doctor with whom i work. I was greatly respect him, and so was much concerned when i read this. I asked him about this, particularly the soy recommendations. He said i mis-read it, that the article says to "limit soy." He felt that over all the article is good as it stands, that folks should largely eat a plant-based diet, that while he might disagree with some of it, his contract with the source of the article (articles he buys) was that he would not edit it (or any other).

    So, while i disagreed with the article, i didn't push it further.

    But yesterday i was discussing diet with my mother in law. I was telling her about limiting grains and other reductions i had come to believe in. Even tho i myself eat a largely vegetarian diet, i do not believe that grass-fed animal meat is inherently bad for humans. I was also telling her that even oatmeal (touted as good for us and cholesterol-lowering) tends to raise blood sugar. In general, grains seem to be damaging to our bodies, even the "whole grains" that are so encouraged in our current standard American diet.

    Whist speaking with my MIL, she began quoting to me from this article! She kept saying "But Dr. G said . . . " She must have said this to me four or five times in our conversation. Each time, she was quoting the very things from this article with which i disagreed the most - the things that the doctor had told me i misunderstood.

    So i needed some feedback on this to see if i was way off track on my feelings. Personally, i don't agree that dairy products are inherently bad, either, but different people respond to things uniquely. Dairy may not fit for some, but doesn't seem to be a problem for others, and i don't feel, just as in the case of meat, it needs to be written off for all people.

    Considering that this article doesn't provide any resources/citations and makes broad statements "studies show this to be true," i have to question the article in its entirety. It bothers me very much that this article, with questionable science, is sent out from my office and the very things with which i most disagree are quoted back to me by my MIL. She is currently open to learning, but i'm not comfortable with something which uses questionable science to be her learning material. It also neglects to mention the very thing that many have said here: A multitude of minerals as well as Vitamin D and weight-bearing exercise.

    It just seems to me that this is an article very light on the good things and greatly missing many important things.

    Thanks for your input.

  10. #10
    EmmaPeel
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    Ah, Aaltrude, I see now what you meant...the whole dairy thing.

    I completely agree. Raw milk has many good properties, but it, (and all dairy) should not be touted as the preventative savior towards bone loss.

    Again, bone loss, I would think, is found predominantly in women who reside in countries(like the U.K.) where sunshine, meat, & fresh fruit and veg. during their younger, bone building years did not occur.

    Famine also appears to effect bone loss.

    http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/36/5/1143.full

  11. #11
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaPeel
    Ah, Aaltrude, I see now what you meant...the whole dairy thing.

    I completely agree. Raw milk has many good properties, but it, (and all dairy) should not be touted as the preventative savior towards bone loss.

    Again, bone loss, I would think, is found predominantly in women who reside in countries(like the U.K.) where sunshine, meat, & fresh fruit and veg. during their younger, bone building years did not occur.

    Famine also appears to effect bone loss.

    http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/36/5/1143.full
    Emma; sunshine, meat, fresh fruit and veg were abundant for my other on the dairy farm during her childhood. They grew their own veges, had plenty of fruit trees, grew their own meat, were out in the sun tending the farm and had plenty of raw dairy products. She developed early onset osteoporosis in spite of all these "positive" factors.

  12. #12
    EmmaPeel
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaltrude
    Emma; sunshine, meat, fresh fruit and veg were abundant for my other on the dairy farm during her childhood. They grew their own veges, had plenty of fruit trees, grew their own meat, were out in the sun tending the farm and had plenty of raw dairy products. She developed early onset osteoporosis in spite of all these "positive" factors.
    So...are you saying that the 'diagnosis' was false? That her bone loss was 'normal' for her aging? Not sure.

  13. #13
    Veteran Member Reesacat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    Quote Originally Posted by Katee
    Thank you for your input. I have issues with this article. It arrived in an email newsletter. I often let these sit for a while, but Wednesday i had time and opened it. I skimmed the article and this stood out glaringly:

    . . . recent studies are showing that it may be a low fat and low cholesterol plant based diet. . . The animal-protein link has been known for some time. . . High-quality proteins come from vegetables and whole grains.

    Then i read this:

    . . . If you are someone who is trying to wean yourself from dairy foods and miss the taste, try some of the soy-based non-dairy milks and cheeses . . . it is important to watch out for the fat content in those products. Many of them are still loaded with it and more.

    After much study on the issue, i have come to believe that the "low fat, low cholesterol" diet is a huge mistake. I believe the current food pyramid recommendations of eating a large portion of our calories as grains and very little fat is much of what is driving the ill health of our country including diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. I also believe that soy is NOT a health food and should never be consumed by humans unless it is fermented. So i was much concerned about these recommendations.

    This newsletter came from my office. I have much regard for the doctor with whom i work. I was greatly respect him, and so was much concerned when i read this. I asked him about this, particularly the soy recommendations. He said i mis-read it, that the article says to "limit soy." He felt that over all the article is good as it stands, that folks should largely eat a plant-based diet, that while he might disagree with some of it, his contract with the source of the article (articles he buys) was that he would not edit it (or any other).

    So, while i disagreed with the article, i didn't push it further.

    But yesterday i was discussing diet with my mother in law. I was telling her about limiting grains and other reductions i had come to believe in. Even tho i myself eat a largely vegetarian diet, i do not believe that grass-fed animal meat is inherently bad for humans. I was also telling her that even oatmeal (touted as good for us and cholesterol-lowering) tends to raise blood sugar. In general, grains seem to be damaging to our bodies, even the "whole grains" that are so encouraged in our current standard American diet.

    Whist speaking with my MIL, she began quoting to me from this article! She kept saying "But Dr. G said . . . " She must have said this to me four or five times in our conversation. Each time, she was quoting the very things from this article with which i disagreed the most - the things that the doctor had told me i misunderstood.

    So i needed some feedback on this to see if i was way off track on my feelings. Personally, i don't agree that dairy products are inherently bad, either, but different people respond to things uniquely. Dairy may not fit for some, but doesn't seem to be a problem for others, and i don't feel, just as in the case of meat, it needs to be written off for all people.

    Considering that this article doesn't provide any resources/citations and makes broad statements "studies show this to be true," i have to question the article in its entirety. It bothers me very much that this article, with questionable science, is sent out from my office and the very things with which i most disagree are quoted back to me by my MIL. She is currently open to learning, but i'm not comfortable with something which uses questionable science to be her learning material. It also neglects to mention the very thing that many have said here: A multitude of minerals as well as Vitamin D and weight-bearing exercise.

    It just seems to me that this is an article very light on the good things and greatly missing many important things.

    Thanks for your input.
    I think the best diet advice comes from the Weston A. Price foundation, including recommended brands of products. They are not big on lots of grains, and if you do use them they encourage you to prepare them traditionally to break down phytic acid by soaking or fermenting. They encourage good fats, raw milk, clean animal protein sources, naturally fermented foods and lots of veggies! and have a lot of resources on the site to learn from. They do not think soy is a health food except for small amounts of non-GMO traditionally fermented products.
    They talk about different types of foods, but leave you to decide what to eat and in what quantities as we are all very different and have different needs at different times in our lives.
    www.westonaprice.org
    Last edited by Reesacat; 09-24-10 at 06:52 PM.

  14. #14
    Veteran Member Maurya's Avatar
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    Default Re: Managing osteoporosis

    Reesacat, I am with you on the Weston Price Foundation's views on diet and food. So much depends on Where was it grown? How was it grown? How was the food prepared?

    As to the strontium issue, I think it may have been Dr Wright who said that strontium citrate is the most effective form to take, particularly instead of the strontium ranelate form that currently is being flogged by US physicians.

    For me personally, I was mostly cured of my desire for dairy food a couple of years ago. During my first boiler inspection at the slaughterhouse, the obligatory "let's see if we can get the new boiler inspector to puke" ritual took place. The Holstein milk cows standing there, with full udders, ready to be killed, really brought the reality of dairy products home for me. Not even cream in my coffee any more. (They did not succeed in getting me to puke.)

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