Green tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk: a report from the Shanghai Men's Health Study

Green tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk: a report from the Shanghai Men's Health Study
Gong Yang1,*, Wei Zheng1, Yong-Bing Xiang2, Jing Gao2, Hong-Lan Li2, Xianglan Zhang1, Yu-Tang Gao2 and Xiao-Ou Shu1
+ Author Affiliations

1Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
2Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai 200032, China
↵*To whom correspondence should be addressed. Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 2525 West End Avenue, Suite 600, IMPH, Nashville, TN 37203-1738, E-mail: Gong.Yang@Vanderbilt.edu, Fax: 615-936-8291.
Received December 9, 2010.
Revision received July 27, 2011.
Accepted August 4, 2011.
Abstract

Tea and its constituents have demonstrated anti-carcinogenic activity in both in vitro and in vivo animal studies. Results from epidemiologic studies, however, have been inconsistent. Some factors that coexist with tea consumption, such as cigarette smoking, may confound or modify the association between tea consumption and cancer risk.

Read the abstract: http://carcin.oxfordjournals.org/con...gr186.abstract