Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

  1. #1
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,099

    Default Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Nourishing Traditions, the cookbook based on the work of Weston A. Price, puts more effort into sauerkraut than I do, so I'll include it here, though I don't think it matters.

    1 medium cabbage, cored and shredded
    1 T. caraway seeds
    1 T. sea salt
    4 T. whey (if not available, use an additional T. salt)

    Mix cabbage, caraway seeds, salt & whey. Pound with wooden hammer or meat pounder for 10 minutes to release juices. Place in a quart wide-mouth mason jar & press down until juices come to the top. Top of the cabbage should be at least an inch below top of jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temp for 3 days before transferring to cold storage. Kraut may be eaten immediately but improves with age.

    Really, if you do this in quantity in a crock, as long as you use the plate-&-rock combo to keep the cabbage submerged, there is no need to cover anything!
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

  2. #2
    Veteran Member Reesacat's Avatar
    Join Date
    24th September 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    7,112

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Wonder why she pounds it?

  3. #3
    Veteran Member mellowsong's Avatar
    Join Date
    24th September 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,570

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    I have never bothered pounding. There's really no need, especially if you use a food processor to shred. The pounding is just to release more juice. I also use water kefir as a starter, not whey. Whey as a started tends to leave your sauerkraut mushy. The water kefir leaves it nice and crispy. Also, I don't get mold on top with water kefir. As Islander posted in the other thread, there's really no need for a starter at all. Cabbage is full of lactobacillus so will ferment just fine on its own with salt, it just takes longer. I throw various things in mine such as 1/2 a daikon radish, shredded carrots, juniper berries. I also use a tiny bit of red pepper flakes. I used to throw raw garlic in til someone told me you can get botulism that way. I don't know for sure, but not willing to take a risk.

    I pack mine into 1/2 gallon glass jars. Make sure fully covered with liquid. I let ferment on the counter about 3 or 4 days, then in refrigerator for another week or 2. It is actually ready to eat after the 3 or 4 days (using a starter) but the flavor develops more.

    So, my method:
    1 med cabbage shredded
    1/2 cup water with 1 T sea salt dissolved in it. Water must be distilled or filter in some manner as to make sure there is no chlorine or chloramines in it. I've also used spring water. It helps to use warm water to dissolve the salt, then let it cool before adding.
    1 cup water kefir.
    Extra water if needed
    Pack cabbage into jar as tightly as possible, 2 or 3 cups at a time. With each addition, take a potato masher or something and compact the cabbage even further. Keep adding and compacting til jar is completely full.
    Mix the salt water and water kefir and slowly pour over cabbage giving it time to get all the way through. If liquid not over top of cabbage when all has been added, add more water until covered.
    Cap jar ... use plastic lid...not quite air tight.
    Place in pan because it will leak, cover with cloth to block light, and leave on counter for 3 days. Check daily and add water as needed to keep cabbage covered.
    After 3 days (I leave for 4 to 5 days in winter), place in refrigerator.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member Aaltrude's Avatar
    Join Date
    2nd November 2008
    Posts
    4,263

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Thank you. Recipe saved. This sounds a lot simpler than one I have tried previously (unsuccessfully) form the book Wild Fermentation.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    14th July 2010
    Posts
    1,447

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Thanks again, Islander!

  6. #6
    Member bormal's Avatar
    Join Date
    4th May 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Islander- Do you have your recipe up on HH somewhere? I have been looking but not finding it. If not, would you share it? I don't have a food processor, will it matter if the shreds of cabbage are not quite as shredded as they are with the processor? Thanks in advance,
    Laura

  7. #7
    Veteran Member Reesacat's Avatar
    Join Date
    24th September 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    7,112

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Bormal, here is a link to a great video on how to make sauerkraut Islander posted:
    http://www.hawkeshealth.net/communit...raut#post47477

    I know people who chop it by hand and do fine — you do need to pound it a bit more to release the juice.

  8. #8
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,099

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Bormal, here is my recipe, the simplest I've ever seen with absolutely no need to pound. If your cabbage is shredded rather coarsely, pounding might help to release the juices but they will all be released eventually anyway.

    I use 6 pounds of cabbage and 5 tablespoons of salt, preferably kosher or pickling but I'm sure sea salt would do just fine. Shred the cabbage with a food processor, a box grater or by hand. Mix it with the salt. I pack mine into sterile pint jars and fill with cold well water. Cover tightly and leave at room temperature for a few days to initiate fermentation. They may then be moved to a cooler spot or refrigerated; in either case fermentation will continue. My Maine cellar is 55° year-round and my sauerkraut keeps perfectly down there. Hope that's what you were looking for!
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

  9. #9
    Member bormal's Avatar
    Join Date
    4th May 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    I have had my kraut in the basement for probably the last couple of months. I had the covers on the mason jars loosely to avoid explosions with the gas building up. Probably the first 1.5 inches of each jar has mold all over it- this has turned the top maybe 2 inches of kraut to mush. Is there any way to prevent this from happening?

  10. #10
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,099

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Yes, Bormal. Active, lively fermentation will take3-7 days depending on the ambient temperature. The covers should be screwed on tightly, then unscrewed just enough for fermentation gases to escape. Then the covers need to be screwed on tightly so that no new [spoilage] bacteria can enter.

    You will have to use your judgment as to whether any of the contents can be saved. Occasionally I will open a jar of jam or applesauce and find a bit of mold on top, which I remove with a spoon. I've read that mold on "soft" foods like these can have roots that descend deeper into the substance; I have never found that to be true, nor has any member of my family sickened from eating something that had a moldy bit on top. Your kraut sounds more serious. After removing the mushy bits, you might carefully sample a small bite from the bottom and judge whether there is an off flavor... and whether you feel any after-effects. To be safe, you might want to compost this batch and begin again. The first time I tried fermenting, I put the jars in a 9x13 pan in case anything bubbled out — but nothing ever did. May just be the luck of my very cool (50˚) cellar. Anyway, don't give up. Try again!
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

  11. #11
    Member bormal's Avatar
    Join Date
    4th May 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Thanks again to Islander and Reesacat for your responses to my many questions on making kraut. I finally tried it again-exactly the way Islander said to do it, and it is WONDERFUL- crisp, tart, I don't think I ever had any kraut this good before. Thanks to all for this thread!

  12. #12
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,099

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Oh, I'm glad that worked for you, Bormal! Here is a variation on that same recipe: next time you make it, chop an apple and add it into the cabbage mix. Makes a nice mellow change in the finished product.
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

  13. #13
    Member bormal's Avatar
    Join Date
    4th May 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    I will try that the next time Islander! I'm also (since having all this dizzying success with my current batch) thinking of making a few jars of kimchi next time as well.

  14. #14
    Administrator Islander's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th September 2007
    Location
    Maine, USA. The way life should be.
    Posts
    18,099

    Default Re: Sally Fallon's Sauerkraut

    Great idea, but don't come to me for kimchi advice. I didn't use a recipe, I just winged it, and was not happy with the results. Next time I'll try an actual recipe!
    ➤ Happiness is the frosting on the cake of contentment.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<<<<<<<< Your Customized Value <<<<<<<<